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The Political and Cultural Conflict between the United States and Puerto Rico

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  • The Political and Cultural Conflict between the United States and Puerto Rico


    The precise legal nature of the relationship between the United States and the people of Puerto Rico was not explicitly determined in 1898 when the Treaty of Paris transferred sovereignty over Puerto Rico from Spain to the United States. Since then, many court cases, beginning in 1901, have been instrumental in defining this delicate relationship.

    While the legislation has clearly established the non-existence of Puerto Rican nationhood and lack of independent Puerto Rican citizenship, the debate over Puerto Rico's status continues to this day.

    Malavet offers a critique of Puerto Rico's current status as well as of its treatment by the U.S. legal and political systems. Puerto Rico is a colony of the United States, and Puerto Ricans living on this geographically separate island are subject to the United States's legal and political authority. They are the largest group of U.S. citizens currently living under territorial status. Malavet argues that the Puerto Rican cultural nation experiences U.S. imperialism, which compromises both the island's sovereignty and Puerto Ricans' citizenship rights. He analyzes the three alternatives to Puerto Rico's continued territorial status, examining the challenges manifest in each possibility, as well as illuminating what he believes to be the best course of action.


    "Provides a new and needed approach to understanding the development and current status of Puerto Rico."

    — Choice

    America’s Colony incisively analyzes the legal treatment of Puerto Rico as a U.S. territory and the second class treatment of Puerto Ricans. This important book is sure to become an influential critical analysis of the subordination of Puerto Ricans, who contrary to popular opinion are U.S. citizens by birth. Denied representation in the U.S. Congress and the right to vote for President, it is no surprise that Puerto Ricans on the island are denied the education, public benefits, and basic rights that other U.S. citizens enjoy. Importantly, America’s Colony traces the legal justification for such treatment, including the amazing U.S. Supreme Court cases from the early twentieth century — decisions that have remained law to this day — that the U.S. Constitution simply does not fully apply to the territory of Puerto Rico. For anyone interested in one of the last American colonies, and modern Puerto Rico, including the controversy over bomb testing on the Puerto Rican island of Vieques, Malavet’s book is essential reading.”

    — Kevin R. Johnson, University of California at Davis School of Law

    “In an era increasingly concerned with democracy around the world, Malavet reminds us of the forgotten colony in our own backyard — Puerto Rico. Utilizing a Critical Race/Latino Theory perspective, Malavet make the legal case for a post-colonial future in which reparations will be owed.”

    — Adrien K. Wing, University of Iowa College of Law

  • #2
    political and cultural conflict

    as long as the u.s tries to continue to think of puerto rico as another hawaii, there will always be conflicts, first we are not polynesians we are hispanics, second culture and language is an integral part of us, the more you try to americanize us the more resistance.
    then there is the fact that there is a paranoia in regards to hispanics in the u.s. the more abuse the less confidence in the anglo government.

    Comment


    • #3
      historiador wrote:

      >as long as the u.s tries to continue to think of puerto rico as another hawaii, there will always be conflicts,

      First of all historiador the U.S had dropped thinking of Puerto Rico as another Hawaii a long time ago. I even wonder If it ever did. When Hawaii was annexed in 1895 it immediately became an incorporated territory ( a first step towards statehood) , not so Puerto Rico, MMMMMMMMMMMMMM Why?

      I guess at first Gringos thought they could assimilate the island in one generation, something they tried doing by pushing English down their throats. They eventually gave up by 1940.


      >second culture and language is an integral part of us, the more you try to americanize us the more resistance.

      I whole heartly agree but............. as of lately there is a large segment of Puerto Ricans who are intent on making us a bilingual state. According to a guy on the PIP board there are 300,000 kids learning English as their first language on the island. Apparently they are preparing future generations to become assimilated and take hold of a future 51st state.

      If you speak to many Puerto Ricans today they agree that everybody should become bilingual. What they don't understand is the agenda behind this so called bilingualism. In addition, most folks on the island know that becoming a state will perpetuate the so called "benefits" they are used to getting from the federal Government. Who in their right mind is going to kill the goose that lays the golden eggs?

      Historiador, I think we are ready to assimilate for a few food stamps and Bush type scare tactics. However what we don't count on is the Gringos. What do they want? Are we in their best national interests? Will they bow to our desires and let us in "POR DAME ACA ESTAS PAPAS?" That's what we should be discussing.

      That my friend is the crux of the problem. The gringos will have to call the shots and let us know. At this point we're a lost cause.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by historiador View Post
        as long as the u.s tries to continue to think of puerto rico as another hawaii, there will always be conflicts, first we are not polynesians we are hispanics, second culture and language is an integral part of us, the more you try to americanize us the more resistance.
        then there is the fact that there is a paranoia in regards to hispanics in the u.s. the more abuse the less confidence in the anglo government.
        First of all If they had treated us like Hawaii we would be a state by now but a state run by landlords living in the continent and not the islanders themselves as was the situation in the first half of the last century.
        Second of all we are already americanized whether you like it or not, a lot of people now watch either cable or a satellite TV service and American English speaking TV stations and TV shows.

        Comment


        • #5
          Whatever conflict there is isn't of any major significance in the minds of most Puerto Ricans who feel very comfy in the present status quo. If indeed Puerto Ricans dare to request statehood and the Americanos reject that petition-then Puerto Ricans will humbly accept that decision and go quietly back to the ELA where they will remain for the duration of their territorial existence since anything else to them is utterly unthinkable.

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