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  • Translation Help

    First of all let me say hello to everyone on the board. Ok, now I have this problem. I want to learn spanish, but the spanish dialect I want to learn is the dialect of puerto rico. I think the way they speak spanish is like the best that I have heard from any spanish speaking group. So I went out and got me some spanish music. "Tego Calderon" is who I got, I figured I would get his CD since he is from Puerto Rico and and that is the dialect that I am trying to learn, along with culture as well. My problem is he has this song called "Cosa Buena". And in that song he uses phrases that I cant understand or find in a dictionary. Such as

    1.Candanza
    2.No se apenen
    3.No se alteren ni me fantasmeen
    4.sandungueo
    5.son supuesto reales
    6.datela pal carajo
    7.bellaqueo

    I tried to find these words and phrases in my dictionary, but there was nothing in my dictionary that matched up with these word.Can someone PLEASEEEE!! translate these words and phrases and tell me what they mean. Thanx a million

  • #2
    Well, for number 2 apenar means to grieve. So I guess he's saying Don't grieve. I think for number 3 he's saying "Don't change me or enchant me?" I don't really no what fantasmeen means. I know fantasma means ghost or phantom. I think number 5 is saying "they're so-called real" or "they're supposed to be real" or something like that. I think number 6 means "**** off"

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    • #3
      Trying to learn a language from slang or music lyrics is the worst way to learn a language.

      It is my experience that Puerto Ricans will just as soon murder the Spanish language as any other group in South America. The majority of us don't even pronounce the letter "R" as it should be pronounced. We tend to drag it instead of roll it off our tongs.

      If you really want to learn Spanish I recommend this website: http://spanish.about.com/

      Gerald Erichsen is the best teacher online that I have seen to date on the Spanish language.

      I have done a couple of translations from English to Spanish of interesting pieces I have found online with no Spanish equivalents, I have included both the Spanish and the English versions, one is a humorous story:

      ¡Para todos los niños que sobrevivieron los 1950s, 60s, y 70s!

      Una historia humorosa de la vida real

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      • #4
        Puertorricans speak a language not a dialect!!!!!!!!

        Is like you are saying that you want to learn English in the US by listening to rap music. Does not make any sense. Puertorricans speak the same Spanish as all the other Spanish speaking nations, is like English from Australia, the US, Virgin Islands, south of England, Maine, Georgia, is all the same but for the accents and some local lingo. Tego and the others speak a language that is unique to their genre and can not be found in dictionaries because most of those words do not exist, they are street parlance and poetic license, not your run of the mill language. Inmersion works the best for learning a world language, maybe you could ask Tego for an internship. Any way...

        Candanza-who knows what the heck it means
        No se apenen- don't be sad
        No se alteren no me fantasmeen-don't get exited and don't fake me
        Sandungueo- rhythym
        son supuesto reales-supposedly the real thing
        datela pal carajo- go to hell ( have a beer in hell?)
        bellaqueo-hornyness

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        • #5
          jajajaja no sabia que bellaqueo era eso! entonces bellaco es alguien que siempre esta asi?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by NelsoN View Post
            Trying to learn a language from slang or music lyrics is the worst way to learn a language.

            It is my experience that Puerto Ricans will just as soon murder the Spanish language as any other group in South America. The majority of us don't even pronounce the letter "R" as it should be pronounced. We tend to drag it instead of roll it off our tongs.

            If you really want to learn Spanish I recommend this website: Spanish Language: Learn Spanish grammar, vocabulary and culture

            Gerald Erichsen is the best teacher online that I have seen to date on the Spanish language.

            I have done a couple of translations from English to Spanish of interesting pieces I have found online with no Spanish equivalents, I have included both the Spanish and the English versions, one is a humorous story:

            ¡Para todos los niños que sobrevivieron los 1950s, 60s, y 70s!

            Una historia humorosa de la vida real
            We do that because the Spaniards who went to the island were from a region of Spain which did roll the "r" off their tonsils. That also came from a region of Spain where R is substituted by "L". Listen, I met one of these tonsil- "R" -rolling Spaniards in Miami and thought he was Puerto Rican. He wasn't. He was from the Canary islands and that's the way they pronounce Th e "R" there. The other Spaniards who went to the island were mostly from Andalusia where they drop the "S". So we do the same.

            So if the mother Patria taught us those ways, then no surprise we use them.


            I watch Univision on as regular basis and the Mexican accent violates the proper emphasis so much that it is sometimes unintelligible. Especially when they are trying to get in 15 minutes worth of news in 15 seconds. Then the absurdities begin. It's a real pity that neither here in the USA nor over there in the island children aren't taught these basic facts about our history and have to go around feeling inferior to these other Latins who really murder the language via excessive incorporation if indian words.


            BTW
            A great part of our distinctive sing song way of speaking Spanish comes from the Tainos.

            Excerpt:

            Spanish and European influences
            Since most of the original settlers of Puerto Rico between the 15th and 18th centuries came from Andalucia, the basis for most of Puerto Rican Spanish is Andalusian Spanish (particularly that of Seville). For example, the endings -ado, -ido, -edo often drop intervocalic /d/ in both Seville and San Juan: hablado > hablao, vendido > vendío, dedo > deo (intervocalic /d/ dropping is quite widespread in coastal American dialects). Seville Spanish is also the source of the merger of phonemes /s/ (coSer) and /θ/ (coCer) that are both pronounced /s/ in much of Andalusia and generally in all Latin America dialects. This merger is called 'seseo' and makes pairs like cocer/coser, abrazar/abrasar, has/haz, vez/ves homophonous. Another Andalusian trait is the tendency to weaken postvocalic consonants, particularly /-s/: 'los dos > lo do, 'buscar' > buhcá(l). Pronouncing "l" instead of "r" is also a trait of Puerto Rican Spanish that has its origin in southern Spain.

            Canarian Spanish (from Spain's Canary Islands off the coast of North Africa) also made a contribution to Puerto Rican Spanish as many Canarios came in hopes of establishing a better life in the Americas. Most Puerto Rican immigration in the early 19th century involved Canary Islands' natives, who, like Puerto Ricans, had inherited most of their linguistic traits from Andalusia. Canarian influence is most present in the language of those Puerto Ricans who live in the central mountain region, who blended it with the remnant vocabulary of the Taíno. Canarian and Caribbean dialects share a similar intonation which, in general terms, means that stressed vowels are usually quite long. Puerto Rican and Canarian Spanish are strikingly similar. When visiting Tenerife or Las Palmas, Puerto Ricans are usually taken at first hearing for fellow-Canarians from a distant part of the Canary archipelago.

            Later in the 19th century other Spanish immigrants from Catalonia, the Balearic Islands, Asturias and Galicia plus other European settlers—mostly from France (including Corsica), Italy, Ireland, Scotland, Germany, and even some overseas Chinese—settled in Puerto Rico. Words from these regions and countries joined the linguistic stew.
            Puerto Rican Spanish - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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            • #7
              A lot of Puerto Ricans, not just those from the U.S. think the Spanish we speak in Puerto Rico is a bunch of crap. They've heard it from Dominicans, Cubans, Mexicans, and Spaniards. Like I've said here a lot of times, most of us believe them because we have a lack of educational sophistication and low self worth. We aren't quick enough or have the facts to put them in their place.

              These people know who they can say things to, and get away with it.

              However, listening to Hip Hop, Ghetto Salsa and Reggaetón 24/7 + a healthy dose of Univision, BET And watching Jersey shore, what more can you expect? LOL

              Is it also Colonialism and lack of polish?

              American Blacks felt the same way before the Civil Rights era, they still do. Some have even tried to establish EBONICS as an alternative language, much like some Nuyoricans have tried to do with Spanglish, thinking its cute and very Puerto Rican! Without knowing it they de-mean themselves and re-enforce stereotypes among "those others" who love to put them down.

              Anecdote:

              When I went to Spain for the first time this uneducated "Cateto" ( Hill Billy) said to me, "Oiga, Señó le voy a enseñarrrr a prEnunciar. ¿PRENUNCIAR? Some unsuspecting and low self worth Rican would have lowered his head and said to himself, I guess my Spanish isn't good enough, if this is coming from a Spaniard, what else can I say?

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