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Yo soy Boricua, pa'que tu lo sepas

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  • Yo soy Boricua, pa'que tu lo sepas


    "The famous Puerto Rican Day Parade in New York City jump-starts Rosie Perez's witty take on Puerto Rican culture. The parade marches to its own ecstatic beat, as does its people through triumph and indignity. Perez, the Academy Award®-nominated actress turned filmmaker, never lets the footing get too heavy. She and codirector Oscar®-nominated documentarian Liz Garbus enlighten through humor and Perez's own sparkling presence. Weaving snippets of Perez and her family with thought-provoking history narrated by actor Jimmy Smits, the filmmakers render a pastiche of unbridled optimism. The title is a contagious colloquial chant of the island's indigenous people, the Taíno. Puerto Ricans do not doubt their identity, the subjects of the film tell us, but they are determined to let the rest of the world know who they are. Pride, often an overused word, comes alive in a documentary that goes down as easily as a frothy cocktail-and still packs a punch. American exploitation and the fight for political clout are no laughing matters but Boricua shows that toughness sometimes means laughing in the face of such obstacles. In one funny bit, Perez encounters an acute case of mistaken perception on her way to a speaking engagement. As her brethren illustrate throughout the film, the show must go on. Puerto Ricans' contributions to the arts and their inextricable link to New York City (Perez grew up in Bushwick, Brooklyn, just so you know!) reveal the beating heart of a small island whose arteries course throughout society."

    - Ron Dicker

  • #2
    I have always liked Rosie Perez. Full of laughter and fun. And she went to college and studied biology I think. And was a dancer. A fly girl. Quite an interesting woman. Puerto Rican women I have always loved. I think we are quite a great group of women.

    Thanks for bringing this to the forum Khuttar. BTW did you see that movie? Lol. As busy as you are...I doubt it.

    Comment


    • #3
      Was the date on the OP wrong?

      It looks like a three year old thread. Is the info correct for this year's parade?

      Comment


      • #4
        The idealization of poverty

        Although many here may differ, but I saw Rosie Perez' film some time ago and was appalled by its mis- understanding of Puerto Rican culture. It was basically filmed from the view point of Puerto Ricans who have lived in New York for decades, isolated, and stuck to a Puerto Rico that disappeared a long time ago. Worse of all it was an idealization of poverty and illiteracy.

        It gave the impression that Puerto Ricans living in the states were, to a certain extent participants of this culture. Little was made of the fact that half of New York Puerto Ricans have moved else where, supplanted by Dominicans and Mexicans. Nonetheless, the folks depicted in the movie seemed to have never progressed beyond 1949, they stayed put in a world long gone.

        There was a part where they were proud of speaking Spanglish. To them it was REAL Puerto Rican talk. It was quaint, but divorced from our reality. We've have a century old struggle to keep Standard Spanish and prevent it from becoming a patois. But does Rosey Perez care? She only cares of taking her $$$$$$$$$ to the bank.

        The setting was in a house in an abandoned lot, built like homes haven't been built in Puerto Rico since the 1920's, It was like wanting to keep a Puerto Rico mired in poverty, from which they all had to flee. I know some of these things are Folkoric, but to idealize poverty and wanting to remain Third world is not my cup of tea. In fact that is where NY Puerto Ricans differ from all other immigrant groups.

        Funny, I've never heard anyone here talk about Raquel Ortiz' fantastic film MI PUERTO RICO, 1996, which takes us on a journey through our history, African, Taíno, Spanish and American. In fact you can actually learn things.

        It's sad how Rosie's film only contributes to reinforcing why Nuyoricans and island Puerto Ricans live in alteranate realities. That is also why The Puerto Rican Day Parade is viewed on the island as a display of vulgarity and poverty, while in the states its the best thing that could happen all year, go figure.

        Comment


        • #5
          I never saw the film Clip. So, I can't give an opinion. I did see Raquel Ortiz' film too. Loved it.

          Nuyoricans are a different breed than island Puerto Ricans.

          My parents used to socialize with the founder of Boricua College in New York City. Her name is Antonia Pantoja. She is a gay Puerto Rican Nuyorican woman. Very intelligent and very educated--she wound up retiring on the island and I think was in culture shock for many years. Nuyoricans are not island Puerto Ricans and never will be.

          The environment of New York is very different. The island is very different. And many Puerto Ricans are still stuck in the idealized version of the island. One has to continue to live or visit extensively the island to keep up with the changes. Otherwise, you do fall out of touch.

          Thanks for giving your version of the film on here Clip. I had no idea what it portrayed because I never saw it.

          The works of people I respect who analyze Puerto RIco properly are cultural anthropologists and professional sociologists. Like Sidney Mintz and others who specialize in Caribbean history. I rarely take entertainment figures as historians.

          "Miracle at Santa Anna" by Spike Lee. I saw that. The main character was Hector Negron an ex retired veteran of WWII. The film was not good. The pacing was off and it was way too long and disjointed. Spike Lee should not do WWII films. He is not good at it. Yet there were aspects of his character Hector Negron that was based on what he knew about Nuyoricans in NYC in his life span and it was interesting. But overall the film bombed.

          Comment


          • #6
            Suki

            Remember I only give my opinion, you have to watch both movies and compare.

            About Nuyoricans.

            They are simply Puerto Ricans who have been colonized by a ghetto life style. Thats why when they first arrived on the island they were in shock. I once heard one say they wanted to go back to NY because the islanders wanted to be White. I think he was confusing White with Middle class culture, one that he wasn't used to. He only saw Middle class folks as being white, therefore his perception.

            Nonetheless, the term Nuyorican doesn't only apply to New York Puerto Ricans. It applies to any Rican living in the U.S., or ironically Puerto Rico, that follow a ghetto style, for example Raven. LOL.

            Comment


            • #7
              Raven I don't consider following a ghetto style. He lives in Cottonwood Heights in Utah. A tranquil Utah Salt Lake City suburb. He was in the Navy many years and grew up partly in Bayamon. He likes computers and I think works in computers. He has a son and is a little bit of a mujeriego.

              His values are all about materialism to a certain extent. But he has worked hard his whole life. That disqualifies him as a lumpen. He is a warm individual. I hope he doesn't get offended by my talking about him without him having even read this thread?

              He loves movies. I don't see him as a ghetto guy. He just never studies social science, philosophy, history and all that very in depth. If you don't study and are not interested in a subject yet want to be taken seriously in a topic that requires that to be believable. Then it is a big problem. He has a surprisingly good heart. He likes Tommy Hilfiger clothes and Armani suits and driving Lexus vehicles around. He loves good cars.Lol. He doesn't live in a ghetto. But, he is not like my background at all and I seriously doubt he could understand my background like you can Clip. It takes a different type of person to understand others who live totally different values. MikeRavens' values in life and mine are very different.

              There is something about Mike that is good. Very good. I know what it is, but I don't want to embarass him with that here. Lol.

              Clip, you are very, very bright. You always have been. And you are fairly sophisticated in your tastes and your preferences. And you might say you are an old peo...but you are far from that. You are young in spirit in many ways. I love that. I always will. Such a young little enthusiast for life you are Clip!

              I don't get my joint out of whack over being perceived as ghetto or being nuyorican (I did not grow up as that). I know that Puerto Ricans come in all colors, levels of education, tastes, personalities, abilities, socioeconomic backgrounds, behaviors, and so on. But the bottom line is that we are a very small group of people. And for many that means we are inferior. I don't see it that way at all. I think our relative small size makes for a more intimate community and more of a strong bond. If we can get back to what is the best of us.

              Do you know what I think is the best of us Clip?

              I hope you give your opinion about us....Boricuas de Pura Cepa. The more time goes by the more I LOVE being who I am as a Puerto Rican. Precisely because of our humble origins. Having big egos and big dominant reputations to uphold is a big burden. There are great things to being at peace with one's origins. And humility and being at the same time full of love and life and laughter and warmth and knowledge is a GREAT THING. I would not trade this human experience Clip for anything on Earth.

              You know I have the movie "Que es lo que le paso a Santiago?" the Oscar nominated movie in 1989 from Jacobo Morales as (best foreign language film)--too bad Cinema Paradiso won. But I loved Cinema Paradiso.. The cast in the Puerto Rican film had Tommy Muniz and starring Gladys Rodriguez. And there is a scene in that movie that portrays the best of us as a nationality and a distinct ethnic group. I hope you can tell me which scene it is?

              My husband got a lot of praise in live theater for an interpretation he made of Rene Marquez' "La Carreta" and Idalia Perez Garay loved my husband's spin on the role. He had a role of a Jibaro. My husband though knows there are no more real jibaros left in Puerto Rico of 2010. WE HAVE CHANGED. Into what?

              Into something different but still having a bit of the past going forward. That happens in all human societies.

              Only really ignorant and not very perceptive people stick to stereotyping of other ethnic groups Clip. People with analysis and intelligence and a good sense of the commonalities in humans realize that there is always more than meets the eye in terms of who people as a group are and who people as individuals are.

              And that applies to films too. Good film makers know how to create believable characters with interesting stories and set that in a universal theme of truth or of art....it is what makes literature and film so BEAUTIFUL and great.

              Do you think I should see Rosie's movie? I have heard Rosie in interviews. She is very interesting. People should not dismiss her as some ghetto Puerto Rican woman without any intelligence. She is very bright. Deceptively so. She studied in UCLA I think. Microbiology. Or some science. Her mother and she had a very difficult and antipathetic relasionship and I think she was raised by her Aunt. She was a hard worker her whole life. And she is a fine coreographer in dance Clip. I can vouch for that. I love dance and she is GOOD. Film is another art form. She also expressed DEEP regret in speaking bad Spanish. The reason? Her mother would humiliate her each time she attempted it and made her feel insecure and she stopped speaking it to avoid being embarrassed by her criticisms.

              There is always more than meets the eye with people Clip. I love people I try to understand them. I always will.





              Comment


              • #8
                Raven lives where? In COTTON WOOD HEIGHTS !!!!!!

                Is this where Cotton pickers finally end up?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by clip314 View Post
                  Although many here may differ, but I saw Rosie Perez' film some time ago and was appalled by its mis- understanding of Puerto Rican culture. It was basically filmed from the view point of Puerto Ricans who have lived in New York for decades, isolated, and stuck to a Puerto Rico that disappeared a long time ago. Worse of all it was an idealization of poverty and illiteracy.

                  It gave the impression that Puerto Ricans living in the states were, to a certain extent participants of this culture. Little was made of the fact that half of New York Puerto Ricans have moved else where, supplanted by Dominicans and Mexicans. Nonetheless, the folks depicted in the movie seemed to have never progressed beyond 1949, they stayed put in a world long gone.

                  There was a part where they were proud of speaking Spanglish. To them it was REAL Puerto Rican talk. It was quaint, but divorced from our reality. We've have a century old struggle to keep Standard Spanish and prevent it from becoming a patois. But does Rosey Perez care? She only cares of taking her $$$$$$$$$ to the bank.

                  The setting was in a house in an abandoned lot, built like homes haven't been built in Puerto Rico since the 1920's, It was like wanting to keep a Puerto Rico mired in poverty, from which they all had to flee. I know some of these things are Folkoric, but to idealize poverty and wanting to remain Third world is not my cup of tea. In fact that is where NY Puerto Ricans differ from all other immigrant groups.

                  Funny, I've never heard anyone here talk about Raquel Ortiz' fantastic film MI PUERTO RICO, 1996, which takes us on a journey through our history, African, Taíno, Spanish and American. In fact you can actually learn things.

                  It's sad how Rosie's film only contributes to reinforcing why Nuyoricans and island Puerto Ricans live in alteranate realities. That is also why The Puerto Rican Day Parade is viewed on the island as a display of vulgarity and poverty, while in the states its the best thing that could happen all year, go figure.
                  Well stated Clip! Very well stated! When I heard and read a little about Rosie Perez's movie, that last thing I wanted to do was to see it. It sounded to me like it had "Ghetto" written all over it. I was right!

                  As you stated, many of us have moved up, out, and beyond the Newyorican frame of mind. However, some have lingered and continue to wallow in the mire of that lifestyle. Sadly, some people consider moving past that life as an act of "high mindedness."

                  Back to the movie issue, a few years ago I got to see the debut of Roselyn Sanchez film titled "Yellow." Frankly, I wasn't much impressed with that film either. While it probably wasn't as vulgar as Perez's film, it did nonetheless have elements of poverty, and the usual family chaos that plagues many of our compatriots in Puerto Rico.

                  One thing though, I was completely surprised to see Roselyn Sanchez in person at her film's debut. She is very beautiful and elegant.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Hmmmmmmmm.

                    I was born in El Hospital Municipal De Manati, 1962. I remember my early years there, befor moving to N.Y.C. But since then, I return if God permits me, every year. Gone are the days of Epifania Baez & Don Cacho. Gone are the days of Hulmildad, Sencillez, Honradez. It's just not here. The Island is so Americanized now, if it wasn't for the white sands, clear beach water, palm trees, etc, You wouldn't think you were in Puerto Rico. Sad To Say. But it's true. I still long for the sound of the rain falling on the Cinc at night. The sound of Cows mooing, Gallos cantando, Coquis, the fresh smell of the grass when the morning dew is on it. Long gone are the days of seeing the barrio huddle together after a Hurricane and clear the road for Obras Publicas to reach us. Looking in on your neighbors to see if they were alright. The ppl getting together and making a recolecta and help rebuild whatever the storm took away. Gone are the days of leaving your porton open and stuff en la Marquesina. It's not that the Puerto Ricans living in N.Y are ignorant to the Culture. it's just that the younger Generation have better things to do. Like playing video games, TXTing, hearing Dance/Reggaeton instead of Ramito, Jose Miguel Class, Odilio Gonzalez, El Trio Vega Bajeno (Which my uncle was part of), Yo me pongo mi Gorrita & Guallabera proudly. I love Puerto Rico. I also love New York. I saw the Rosie Perez film. And no matter what, everyone will view it differently, and comment the way they view it. I give credit to any Puerto Rican that's doing anything positive. Lots of Puerto Ricans did in the 50's 60's & 70's what alot of other latinos are doing now. Running Bodegas, working, trying to survive, studying. Then they migrated back to the Isla, got a house, maybe some extra money. Let others do it now. I tell all young Puerto Ricans to learn to speak & write Spanish well. But that's hard for individuals who haven't been taught that as they grew up here. If I'm around a group of Puerto Ricans, I speak Spanish. Not Spanglish. Many of them don't speak it well, so they speak to me in English and I answer in Spanish. LOL. I'm teaching them I suppose. Anyways, This is a good site. I'm here. And Proud to be a Puerto Rican.
                    Ser Puerto Riqueno no necesariamente es ser Nacido & criado en Puerto Rico, sino, llevarlo en tu corazon donde quiera que estes.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by SKILLFULGIL View Post
                      I was born in El Hospital Municipal De Manati, 1962. I remember my early years there, befor moving to N.Y.C. But since then, I return if God permits me, every year. Gone are the days of Epifania Baez & Don Cacho. Gone are the days of Hulmildad, Sencillez, Honradez. It's just not here. The Island is so Americanized now, if it wasn't for the white sands, clear beach water, palm trees, etc, You wouldn't think you were in Puerto Rico. Sad To Say. But it's true. I still long for the sound of the rain falling on the Cinc at night. The sound of Cows mooing, Gallos cantando, Coquis, the fresh smell of the grass when the morning dew is on it. Long gone are the days of seeing the barrio huddle together after a Hurricane and clear the road for Obras Publicas to reach us. Looking in on your neighbors to see if they were alright. The ppl getting together and making a recolecta and help rebuild whatever the storm took away. Gone are the days of leaving your porton open and stuff en la Marquesina. It's not that the Puerto Ricans living in N.Y are ignorant to the Culture. it's just that the younger Generation have better things to do. Like playing video games, TXTing, hearing Dance/Reggaeton instead of Ramito, Jose Miguel Class, Odilio Gonzalez, El Trio Vega Bajeno (Which my uncle was part of), Yo me pongo mi Gorrita & Guallabera proudly. I love Puerto Rico. I also love New York. I saw the Rosie Perez film. And no matter what, everyone will view it differently, and comment the way they view it. I give credit to any Puerto Rican that's doing anything positive. Lots of Puerto Ricans did in the 50's 60's & 70's what alot of other latinos are doing now. Running Bodegas, working, trying to survive, studying. Then they migrated back to the Isla, got a house, maybe some extra money. Let others do it now. I tell all young Puerto Ricans to learn to speak & write Spanish well. But that's hard for individuals who haven't been taught that as they grew up here. If I'm around a group of Puerto Ricans, I speak Spanish. Not Spanglish. Many of them don't speak it well, so they speak to me in English and I answer in Spanish. LOL. I'm teaching them I suppose. Anyways, This is a good site. I'm here. And Proud to be a Puerto Rican.
                      Like you, I was born in Manati around the same time. I too grew up in The Bronx as a child. But I remember being no more than 12 years old and thinking to myself, "I never want to raise children in a place like this." My parents moved us back to the island where I graduated from HS. But, The City was not yet out of me. As the saying goes. . ."you can take the boy outta the city, but you can't get the city outta the boy." I kept going back to NYC on my own as a teen. But still, each time I went back, I came to the same conclusion: NYC was not a place to raise children. Long story short, I ended up living far and away from NYC.

                      Like you, I now visit the island once to twice per year. Each time I visit I question the sustainability of the place I still love. It's a different place, with different attitudes. It's a place where many are simply looking for a way to get on some form of gov't assistance so they no longer have to work for a living; a place where 4 skinny workers support the overbearing weight of 6 fat lazy SOB's whose sole goal is to live off my tax dollars. It's a society which I no longer understand.

                      Tomorrow is the Puerto Rican day parade. Aside from music, athletic acheivements, and a few beauty pagent contestants, can someone tell me what else we're suppose to be celebrating?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Suki View Post
                        Raven I don't consider following a ghetto style. He lives in Cottonwood Heights in Utah. A tranquil Utah Salt Lake City suburb. He was in the Navy many years and grew up partly in Bayamon. He likes computers and I think works in computers. He has a son and is a little bit of a mujeriego.

                        His values are all about materialism to a certain extent. But he has worked hard his whole life. That disqualifies him as a lumpen. He is a warm individual. I hope he doesn't get offended by my talking about him without him having even read this thread?

                        He loves movies. I don't see him as a ghetto guy. He just never studies social science, philosophy, history and all that very in depth. If you don't study and are not interested in a subject yet want to be taken seriously in a topic that requires that to be believable. Then it is a big problem. He has a surprisingly good heart. He likes Tommy Hilfiger clothes and Armani suits and driving Lexus vehicles around. He loves good cars.Lol. He doesn't live in a ghetto. But, he is not like my background at all and I seriously doubt he could understand my background like you can Clip. It takes a different type of person to understand others who live totally different values. MikeRavens' values in life and mine are very different.

                        There is something about Mike that is good. Very good. I know what it is, but I don't want to embarass him with that here. Lol.








                        ..........................................another day in the National Enquirer' forum.....err I meant PUERTO RICO.COM.



                        Last edited by MikeRavens; 16th December 2011, 11:50.

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