Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

37% of Latinos Don't Finish HS. 34% Are Below Grade Level.

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #31
    Originally posted by Stanley
    Companeras:

    The two of you have this flight of ideas and it makes me dizzy.

    Suki: Your monotonous right wing rhetoric gets tired too Stan. Lol.

    However, I would love to hear how Yautia would improve education. But, paleez, do not post irrelevant material to the discussion. Simply tell me how you would improve the state of education.

    Suki: You want the 2 minute analysis? LOL.

    At least the two of you prove my theory that kids tend to be like their parents. Suki is a clone of Yautia. My kids are a lot like me, but the similarities between the two of you are striking!! It make me think of cloning. I wonder if free thinking was encouraged in the Yautia household. How about Mr. Yautia? What is his take in all of this? Is he also a clone? Does he have a diffeent opinion?
    Suki: IF you think PIP and socialism is the majority culture in the USA or Puerto Rico you are a fool Stanley. You are much more mainstream and following the crowd with less free thinking than I. Your mom is pro statehood and so have you become. So where was your free thinking "a fad" in your youth. Like mother like son. At least with la Yautia it was not a fad. lol. Mr. Yautia is dead Stanley. He died of parkinson's and diabetes in 1999. And I adored my father very much. My sister, is a lawyer and she loves Yautia as much as I do. And if you knew all of us. You would notice quite a few differences. But I am proud of mom, and if I could be half as good a person as she is, I would be happy and die with a clear conscience. Lol.

    Suki.

    Comment


    • #32
      Suki:

      Have you ever seen software crash the computer even thou the code is 99.5% correct. Sometimes a subtle fault in that 0.5% makes the computer crash or freeze. I think the analogy works for the two of you. Maybe is hereditary. But it seems that there is a faulty 0.5% in your head that somehow makes you reach the wrong conclusion (socialism). Everything else seems in working other except that glitch. It is a shame, because I don't doubt that you are a very intelligent woman. I don't doubt for a moment that you and your mom are great people and I would never ever dream of putting the two of you down (in a serious way).


      Los recuerdos suelen
      Contarte mentiras



      Stanley

      Comment


      • #33
        Stanley

        Is everyone in the world wealthy? No.
        Should everyone in the world be wealthy? Can the planet sustain over six billion people living upper or ruling class lifestyles? No.

        So has capitalism worked and created jobs for the majority of people in third world countries? No.

        Have international banks been charging interest rates for loans? Yes. Does the principal go down? or up?

        Does difficult economic conditions breed corruption in the third world? Yes or No.

        If the first world does not cope with the lacks of economic opportunities in the third world what is going to happen? Eventually? And would you care?

        According to OXFAM, a world hunger tracking organization,[with no political affiliations to anything except coping with world hunger issues] if every person on planet Earth were to consume at the same level as a middle class suburbanite in the USA....do you know how many years you would have on planet earth before all world resources would be exhausted and no one could eat anything due to no time to recycle resources? 40 years.
        That is it. After that. Nada. Para nadie.

        The USA only represents 6% of world human population that means 92% of the world does not live USA lifestyles.

        I don't think it is realistic to expect a person from a poor village in India to have two laptops and two SUV's and have four bedroom homes in the burbs with a lawnmower. No. But is it "faulty" wiring for them to have a hut with a cement floor, and a wooden rain proof shelter and minimal clothing and food and a bicycle and enough education to provide for their children when they reach the age of majority. And to have rights and be able to lead decent lives and vaccines. If they can't because they are third world people and the interest payments and the 'plusvalia' is all funneled to USA and transnational banks, then I do not glory in capitalism Stanley. I think all people deserve basics. Not just a few. If that makes me wrong as a socialist and you right as pro Capitalist then so be it. I think most wealthy people can't even enjoy their wealth,they are too busy protecting themselves from other 'sharks' in the business world competing and willing to cut each other's throats. And I wish they would realize that time on earth is limited, and why not help to pull everyone out of misery instead of just letting a few lead 'free' lives. There is no free ride in life. But it is important to try to improve the lives of all. Not just some. It is not right to leave people in colonialism. In limbo status. Like the USA does to PR. It is not right to let some cope with oppression and the consequences of totalitarian regimes of the right or the left. Socialism comes from 'society' and living 'socially'. Thinking of the group and not just the individual. The individual is wonderful. But it is more meaningful if you see the individual as a member of a group. Whether that be as a father, a husband, a worker, a neighbor, a human in social reality. Socialism for me is being part of group. And thinking what is best for all not just some.

        Capitalism for you means efficiency, wealth, and prosperity for those deserving of such things. The lazy and the stupid are the ones left behind as it should be. I wish it were like that. But I have met too many people who are neither lazy or stupid who capitalism has not done anything for. Therefore my conclusion that eventually it will evolve or die, but change it must. Because the third world style capitalism I have seen in action.......really stinks.

        Suki.

        Comment


        • #34
          Suki:

          That was a good post; there were no stingers.

          Unfortunately nature is cruel. Just watch the TV shows about animals in the wild. It seems that only the strong survive--------------- Whether it is the lioness with good hunting skills or the Zebra who runs very fast to escape the jaws of the predator. I wish it was not like that, but that is the essence of nature or if you will God. According to Darwin there is a purpose to all of this. This seems to be the basis of evolution: Survival of the fittest/natural selection.

          Unfortunately these cruel laws of nature also affect us. We are no different than those animals and some of us are weak whereas other seem to adapt and are therefore selected.

          It is a very cruel system and we humans have tried hard to alter that cycle. I see socialism as the treatment for the ones who are at the botton of the ladder. It is indeed a noble idea and I can understand why you are such a passionate socialist. In fact I sometimes feel this is more important to you than a capitalist independent PR.

          In any event if one appies the socialism to cure the problems of the ones at the bottom one must shift the wealth from the folks at the top of the ladder (the income producers) to the folks in the bottom (the comsumers). This will work for a short time, but then at some point there will not be enough wealth to shift from the top to the the bottom. There is also the possibility that the ones at the bottom will become too numerous and consume all the wealth create by the smaller number at the top. As you said, the overwhelming majority of the folks in the planet are the ones that need the resources in the hands of the few in the top. If the comsumers of resources get to be much larger than the ones who actually create the wealth then we have chaos. So in the end income redistribution is not a good idea, it only works for a very short time and it increases the numbers of the non-producers (not a good thing).

          So one must hopefully teach the ones with less to produce. This is not an easy task and as you know is something that does not develop overnight. This may take many generations, but I believe that in the end the only way to have an even planet is to make sure everybody knows how to be a producer of wealth. There will be some who may never learn how to produce and perhaps nature will not select them. Maybe some of these folks unable to feed themselves will die of famine. As I said nature can be very cruel. I know this sounds terrible, but I am simply speaking with a scientific mind devoid of compassion.

          The reason capitalism does not work in some lands is probably the same why socialism does not work. The main reason is the human condition-------- we are imperfect and many of us are corrupt. Did you know that the higher ups of the communist party in East Germany had lavished luxurious vacation homes? Did you know that Danny Ortega lined his pockets after he brought Somoza down? The human condition is not perfect. That is why I told your mom that only Jesus could be a good communist. Corruption is evil!


          Los recuerdos suelen
          Contarte mentiras



          Stanley

          Comment


          • #35
            Education and the Power Elite



            Stanley writes:

            I am glad that you agree that Cubans have more academic success than other latinos in the USA. Why not try to copy what they do?

            Dear Stan: There you go again. If you are with the Power Elite, the ideology of Raw Capitalism, ala Matojos and Matojitos, then of course you will have academic success, you will also have more economic success and you should have no problems with the system, i.e. banking, housing, justice, health and the service industry such as hotels and airports. That is the compensation for being a lacky to the power elite. Even a President such a Matojito can admit that although he was a poor student and was a party animal during college, he too, got the chance to become Prez. The real issue is what does it take to be part of the power elite? How much are you willing to give up of your dignity and identity in order to suck up to those in power?

            And no Stanley, I have never sucked up to those in power!

            Sincerely,

            Yautia
            PAZ PARA VIEQUEZ

            Comment


            • #36
              I am a capitalist, not a socialist. Why is it so hard for you to accept me? I accept your left wing radical ideology with no problems. I accept your admiration for Fidel, ALarcon, Mao, and El Che with no problems. Why can you be more tolerant of others who are different?


              I am still waiting for your response to my question on how to improve education:

              Since you are part of the USA EDUCATION SYSTEME BUREAUCRASY maybe you can explan to me your thoughts on how to improve education. After all, you are an insider with a degree in that stuff. I want to hear your solutions!!


              Los recuerdos suelen
              Contarte mentiras



              Stanley

              Comment


              • #37
                Suki said:

                Thinking of the group and not just the individual. The individual is wonderful. But it is more meaningful if you see the individual as a member of a group. Whether that be as a father, a husband, a worker, a neighbor, a human in social reality. Socialism for me is being part of group. And thinking what is best for all not just some.


                I am starting to get the idea of socialism. Lets say you go to the horse races and one or two horses seem to win most of the races because they are much faster than the others. You then realize that it is unfair that these two horses win most of the time you and decide to do something about it. Is that what you are trying to say? You want to make sure all horses have an equal chance to win? I think I get it.



                Los recuerdos suelen
                Contarte mentiras



                Stanley

                Comment


                • #38
                  Well, I guess we just found out why Latino education in America is so bad

                  We cannot get intelligent adults to discuss problems which affect our children without going into personal ideology tangents.

                  For the love of God, lets focus on our kids, who don't live in the Republic of Puerto Rico yet, they live here, today, in our reality. Even if there was a Rep of PR in the future, what future would it be with poorly educated people to keep it afloat?

                  Back to a point Stanley brought earlier regarding parents'influence. I think the parent factor is important, but not the only deciding factor. My mother was the first person in our family to attend college. I was only the second or third. Family education level did not deter my mother nor I from attending college. I was fortunate enough to have people around me who inspired me to dream and teachers who encouraged me to pursue those dreams. I, in turn, inspired my sibblings and others around me to pursue professional careers. Perhaps we are lacking a bit in that department in the states.

                  José

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Jose I know education for latinos is important issue for all of us

                    I don't have lots of time so I will do a quick summary.

                    Teachers:

                    In the USA to be a teacher one has to be a college graduate and hopefully with adequate credits in methodology and education. For Latino kids you have complexity. The first obstacles are these four:

                    1. Language--does the kid come from a bilingual home, a monolingual Spanish speaking household or an all ENGLISH speaking household? He/she needs testing and diagnostic testing to find out what kind of language environment the kid comes from. Once you test the kid supposedly you place him with the most efficient methodology to get him through school.
                    1) Problem number one. No skilled diagnostic people to administer the test.
                    2) The bilingual teacher is not bilingual at all, and in reality can't speak, read or write Spanish adequately. That is okay if the kid is under 12 years old and the teacher is smart enough to realize the kid needs 5-7 months to process the new language and not to flunk the kid while he is in 'pre-production' stage of language acquisition, many teachers are unaware of how and in which way children who do not speak English natively in the home acquire English. Many feel frustrated at not being able to communicate with the non-English speaking child and just shunt him or her aside and or have low expectations from the beginning and in order to make their planning easier track the kid in through special ed or low acheivement tracks. Trust me on this guys I have seen this in action thousands of times.
                    3) Experienced and skilled teachers are wooed away to private schools or to suburban 'good' schools who due to better property tax base funds can offer more attractive benefits packages and salaries and security, the 'poor' schools, have to make due with the less experienced or unexperienced teachers, in crowded classrooms with less resources available and more pressure from principals and administrators to up achievement scores. The new teachers not only have the added pressures of having to get the kids up to scratch, but have to cope with planning in one classroom for high achieving English speaking kids, kids with behavioral problems, kids who don't speak English and maybe no budget for diverse levels of achievement in one classroom. This is assuming the teacher does not feel they are 'middle class' teaching 'working class or underclass' children who have illiterate and inadequate educational cultures in their homes and that they are wasting time since the parents are dummies from third world communities who can't read themselves, and she or he (the teacher) flees in terror at 3:30pm from the school parking lot because they teach in gangland USA and their $31,000 a year salary is not worth them getting shot over some loser kids who are not gonna make it anyway. Some principals think this way too. I have seen it a million times as well.

                    2. The pre-requisites for an excellent classroom.

                    Should I keep going and then have Yautia give you a run down and detailed analysis of why famous educators with successful track records like Jonathon Kozol, Herbert Koehl etc. believe the USA system sucks and fails many children not just Latinos? If you are interested in this analysis we can start a new thread and take the theories one at a time. Everyone will get an education on the failures and successes. And why the successful programs are the exception and not the rule. I think you will be quite angry at the reasons why. Enough hopefully to start doing something about it.

                    Suki

                    We can cover who is Piaget, Montessori, Freire, and many other famous educators and their theories on how to teach children from all socioeconomic backgrounds and be successful. Or we can blame the parents for being poor, uneducated and ignorant and use schools as a babysitting service only. Why have schools for children if we only want to teach children who have the 'approved' and 'appropriate' cultural capital? Middle class kids with married stable parents who are not sick physically, or unemployed, or have drug or alcohol problems, and who have stable middle class jobs and have taught little Juanito or little Johnny or little Mary or little Maria to read before age 5. To count and identify colors. Head start is supposed to do that teach the little ones the right pre-kinder skills. But do all single moms or married moms have access to these programs across the board. Education is a big issue. And the way to educate kids is controversial. But there are proven ways to get results. Great results. Why aren't the proven ways the rule instead of the exception. The society fails kids. It does. And it should not. For children are clay and moldable and such learning machines. They are wonderful. But the adults concepts of what is expected is another thing. And we can continue this theme if there is interest. I will ask Yautia if she feels up to summarizing the famous educators who are effective...without exception they share similar philosophies.

                    [Edited by Suki on 15th February 2003 at 05:46]

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Suki:

                      Very good post!

                      It is a sad story but, the family background is everything. Kids who come from a stable home where edcation is king practically educate themselves quite well in any kind of school system regardless of school resources. OTOH, kids from poor home where education is not valued have no chance.

                      I proposed a system not to different from what Fidel does with Cuban kids. Over there the kids are interned after a certain age in goverment camps for communist indoctrination and the parents are taking out of the loop. Believe it or not this could work for US kids who have highly unstable horrible homes. I believe some kids could be instructed in the basic fundamentals in special camps. Of course, this type of thing would never become a reality in the USA due to many reasons, but it is a thought.

                      Another alternative is to improve the standard of living of the parents. IN fact this is something we see all the time in many families where one generation is college educated due to the economic success of the prior non-college educated generation. The problem with Latino kids is that you have a constant influx of non-educated poor families into the country. Therefore, it is extremely hard to catch up. OTOH, other ethnic groups do not have this constant influx of non-educated families.


                      Los recuerdos suelen
                      Contarte mentiras



                      Stanley

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Parent Training 101

                        [QUOTE]Originally posted by Stanley
                        [B]Suki:

                        Very good post!
                        ___________________________________________________________

                        Stanley, too bad I cannot say the same for your post, it is not too well researched.

                        First point:
                        "It is a sad story but, the family background is everything. Kids who come from a stable home where edcation is king practically educate themselves quite well in any kind of school system regardless of school resources. OTOH, kids from poor home where education is not valued have no chance."

                        Research seems to point in the direction of the Instructional Staff and the Administrators of the School (Local School Site Administrator or Principal) as the factors which will make a difference in the academic achievement of children from low Socio-Economic, Racial, National Origin "Minority groups" in the USA.

                        In our case, bilingual parents, the most important factors are high teacher expectations for those children who come from non-stable homes with low socio cultural markers. Often these are bilingual, multicultural and have been made learning disabled by the "School Site Team" in their individual settings, they are the keys to the equal educational opportunities for those unfortunate children who come from poor home where education, at least formal education is not valued or there is very little chance that the parents will get involved in traditional PTAs.
                        ____________________________________________________________
                        Now my question is: What is wrong with this picture?

                        The Parent :

                        Saludos a todos! Jo. (short for J ibar O)

                        >> ¿Que es ser un Jíbaro Puertorriqueño?
                        >> por Orlando Vázquez (Don Jíbaro Criollo)
                        >> Espero que despues de leer esto, quede claro en sus mentes
                        >>que no hay vergüenza en ser jíbaro o ser campesino, ya que es
                        >>irrelevante pasar la vida tratando de probar a los incrédulos
                        >>quiénes somos, de donde venimos, o pa' donde vamos.
                        >>
                        >> Cuando yo era niño viví en el campo. Mi mai es de Corozal y
                        >>mi difunto pai era de Comerío... Saqué ñame, yautía y malanga,
                        >>ordeñé vacas, ayudé a matar lechones, y me bañé en el rio cuando
                        >>cortaba clase en el campo de Bayamón... Tambien colgué tabaco,
                        >>corté caña, y SOBRETODO bebía café con leche en una taza hecha de
                        >>coco. Toco cuatro, guiro y maraca, y le meto mano al SEIS Chorreao,
                        >>Plena y Guaguancó y también al ROCK and ROLL, JAZZ si hay que
                        >>meterle mano.
                        >>
                        >> El estereotipo de que el Jibaro es un analfabeto, un bruto
                        >>que lo único que sabe hacer es cortar caña, criar gallinas y que
                        >>dice "asina" en vez de "así" es la imagen que estoy tratando de
                        >>eliminar. Esa etiqueta, puesta generalmente por aquellos que
                        >>arrogantemente se creen aristocráticos, o mejores... tiene el
                        >>maligno propósito de, no solamente sellar al campesino como idiota,
                        >>sino que se propone mantenerlo alli. Porque...
                        >>
                        >> "Un jíbaro inteligente es la pesadilla del aristócrata."
                        >> (Don Jibaro)
                        >>
                        >> Ser Jíbaro es más que esterotipos o etiquetas... es ser UNO
                        >>con la Tierra... amar y ser parte del terruño. Yo no sé que es lo
                        >>que te hace a tí un JÍBARO, pero si sé lo que me hace a mí.
                        >>Técnicamente, en realidad el verdadero JÍBARO, es aquel araucano
                        >>cazador de cabezas del Amazonas (de donde proviene el TAINO) que le
                        >>CORTABA la cabeza al su enemigo, la encogía y la guindaba de su
                        >>cintura como TROFEO. También esa imagen hay que erradicarla, pues
                        >>ESE no es el JÍBARO de PUERTO RICO...
                        >>
                        >> YO soy BORICUA, de sangre JÍBARA de PUERTO RICO, manchao de
                        >>plátano y criao con yuca y leche hervía. ESO soy y eso seré hasta
                        >>que me llegue mi sábado. No hay que ser bruto ni matón pa' ser
                        >>JIBARO. Eso es prejuicio y está mal. Yo soy JÍBARO, educao pues FUI
                        >>a la UNIVERSIDAD donde aprendí inglés y a traquetear con
                        >>computadoras! Pero la mancha de plátano NUNCA se me quita. Como
                        >>dije antes, tu eres lo que eres no importa donde estés. ¡Pa'
                        >>encima, Boricua!

                        ___________________________________________________________

                        Now, let us say this JIBARO migrates to a Southern State, one such as Oklahoma, (simply because it was the first US Southern State who desegregated its schools after the Brown vs. the Board Decision (1954), without the Federal Govement having to call out the National Guard, the Army and the local Police in order to protect the Black children and their parents. And because the OK Public Schools took seriously the Civil Rights Act (1964) when they got a black doctor take them to the Supreme Court for lack of "equal educational opportunities for black students" and because in 1975 they were forced to reply to Lau vs. Nichols and promised an "Equal Educational Opportunity to Limited English Proficient Language Minorities (let us say, this JIBARO is one of those). By the year 2001, they have failed to prove they have kept their promise to children who are black, Hispanic, or both.

                        Now, let us say after two years of complaints from the parents to The Office of Civil Rights, Department of Education they come up with a Plan, and promise the following:

                        HISPANIC INITIATIVE WORK SESSION
                        JANUARY 9, 2002, 8 A.M.-12 NOON
                        OSU/OKC – THIRD FLOOR STUDENT CENTER

                        PROFESSIONAL GROWTH (Certified/Classified):
                        Short Term Training:

                        · Make sure the district focuses on the development and implementation of district policy/guidelines concerning language minority/limited English proficient (LM/LEP) students.
                        · District training for assistants, teachers, and administration on how to serve LEP students must be prioritized as well as required.
                        · There should be a district incentive plan (stipends) for staff that speak a language other than English or are seeking English as a Second Language (ESL) and/or Bilingual Education (BE) endorsement (degree or just the credits).
                        · The district should combine professional growth activities to include collaboration with title programs, universities, outside stakeholders, and with-in District programs
                        · Professional growth activities should include productive integrated problem solving activities.
                        · The district needs to promote common goals, eliminate random efforts and funding.
                        · Technology should be used to expand professional growth access – distance learning, “canned “ in-service…
                        · In-service presenters should be used from with-in the ranks; i.e., classroom teachers
                        · All ESL/BE staff should be updated with the current ESL/BE research available.
                        · Unify training, provide curriculum consistency, and establish program guidelines on how to serve Language Minority (LM)/LEP students.

                        Long Term
                        · Seek role models to present material. Use “home grown” presenters when possible.
                        · All stakeholders should be included in in-services, pre-services, and on-going service. Try to influence a paradigm shift on teaching methods that would include successful ESL/BE training for all graduates in the education department.

                        Long-Term Dialogue
                        · Program Longevity: If it works keep doing it!
                        · Continue funding or budget dollars to sustain programs that positively affect the education of LM/LEP students.

                        RECRUITMENT (Teachers/Assistants):
                        · Consider a District-wide ad campaign; i.e., Rock Your World One Student at a time!
                        · Hiring bonus should be provided for staff that is bilingual (Spanish), staff prepared in ESL/BE, and/or staff seeking proficiency in either one of the aforementioned categories.
                        · Recruit from the dual language community - thru churches, high school seniors, at the colleges and universities. Visit college/university education classes. Invite college/universities to tour our schools.
                        · Recruit early in the spring. The summer is no time to focus our recruitment efforts. Good teachers are committed by then.
                        · Hire teachers out of state/country. Seek at conferences, education fairs, and on-site presentations. Consider contacting the Puerto Rican institutes of higher learning.
                        · Work with State Dept. of Education and immigration personnel for statutory de-regulation, alternative certification, and VISAS.
                        · Promote Future Teachers of America, Teacher Cadets, and other teacher preparation activities with the intention of luring in Spanish speaking students.
                        · Retain teachers and assistants by modifying the pay schedule to reflect more enticing salaries and steps.
                        · Increase focus on better working conditions – student discipline, access to technology, resources, materials, and respect (child/teacher friendly).
                        · Promote within teacher assistants that bring degrees from their own countries. De-regs. May be needed.
                        · Offer incentives to teacher assistants, like on the job time to attend school, so that they are encouraged to complete their teaching credentials.
                        · Counselors need to be more aggressive talking to Spanish speaking students and moving them into considering teaching. If counselors would not have to be involved in master scheduling and student schedules, they would have more time fulfilling their responsibility.

                        RESOURCES:
                        · Acquiring materials that enhance English communication and skills; i.e., Learning English through Science. (ISBN#0-81355-061-7)
                        · Provide additional ESL training for all teachers, assistants, and mentors.
                        · Have teachers with high student -test scores to mentor other teachers.
                        · Continue encouraging parental support by offering ESL programs to parents.
                        · Redesign curriculum strategies to be more “hands-on.”
                        · ESL pullout at the Elementary level.
                        · Improve timeline to receive ESL/Bilingual materials and textbooks.
                        · Ensure complete materials are received; i.e., teacher’s manuals, supporting materials, etc.
                        · Share successes of teachers in staff meetings to encourage use of different strategies.
                        · Certified staff to teach evening classes.
                        · Improve community access to schools.
                        · Bring coordinated community education opportunities to the community.
                        · Time: View it as a critical resource. Block Schedule (A/B) costs the classroom teacher 27% of instruction time to teach the same material. Most importantly, block schedule teachers compete for results as expressed in Standardized Test Scores. More students could be served in ESL class sections if not on block schedule.
                        · People: Role models from community meet with student groups.
                        · Each building needs to allocate space to develop a resource room. This room will provide the community as well as parents access to education materials/resources that can assist in student learning.

                        SENSITIVITY TRAINING:
                        · Teachers, parents, and students need to be exposed to all cultures – their believe system, thought process, cultural differences, learning procedures… Training should include: respecting others uniqueness, acknowledging bilingualism as an asset, being familiar with acculturation – students and parents
                        · Adults need to model behavior.
                        · Review the District’s Character Ed. program. Instill a pluralistic view through the interdisciplinary areas.
                        · Change the perception of viewing language as barrier, as separation, as excluding
                        · Present the information to students at their level.
                        · Training should address changing staff and student attitude.
                        · Provide learning opportunities for staff. Specially, make sure all new principals and teachers are sensitive to the community they are responsible to serve. A
                        · Attitude of students, parents, educators, and administrators: start at the top (Supt. Office).
                        · Principal/Assistant Principal-support activities and open door.
                        · Celebrate multicultural assemblies/activities versus individual cultural days.

                        Training Methods:
                        · Continuous: practice what you teach and bring in bilingual trainers with experiences.
                        · Integrate into all training curriculum, teaching, and outreach to parents.

                        PARENTAL INVOLVEMENT:
                        Issues & Concerns:
                        · Lack of participation (parents)
                        · Parents don’t feel welcome (misunderstanding & stereotyped).
                        · Cultural differences: perception of education and perception of role of parents.
                        · Language differences: does school communicate in language of the home?
                        · Parents not aware of policies/politics.
                        · Cross-generational sense of non-involvement and/or failure.
                        · Value conflicts (differences) value of education vs values of family responsibility.
                        · System does not accommodate sustained parental involvement as students go up thru grades.
                        · Influence of popular culture (“Malcolm in the Middle”) how much TV? How do we assist parents of new arrivals on expected changes, behaviors?
                        · Communication with home thru students.
                        · Involvement in the curriculum and academics - not just behavior.
                        · Don’t use children as translators.
                        · Lack of awareness and education on the part of teachers, parents, and principals.
                        · Cultural/ethnic diversity among Hispanics-language differences in Spanish from various Spanish- speaking countries. There are 20 Spanish-speaking countries plus areas in the USA. All these places have differences about the Spanish language and cultural believes.
                        · Expectations for success from all with tolerance and acceptance.

                        Problem Solving:
                        · Need integrated solutions, not ethnicity segregated but still culture and language sensitive. Create a “new” culture.
                        · Strategic plans to establish schools as community centers must include:
                        Ø Authentic, effective needs assessment (personal interviews)
                        Ø Education for parents
                        § Know their rights in U.S.A.
                        § Understand school policy
                        § Invitation for in school involvement
                        § Guidance for at home involvement
                        § Knowledge of “New” cultural difference and expectations
                        Ø Sustained Communication in language of parent and through students.
                        · Teacher awareness and training
                        Ø Effective involvement strategies
                        Ø Cultural awareness and respect, acceptance of community services.
                        · Administrative support for community partnering
                        Ø Financial support for food and meetings etc…
                        Ø Need long-term ongoing plans, adjustments, and efforts.
                        · Parental involvement is a process not an end
                        · Parents need information about effects of TV-possibilities of education (college), resources available in community, and reach out and include college and Jr. college reps.
                        · All school personnel need training including secretaries (first contact), counselors, principals, everyone!
                        · Need accountability for counselors /educators.
                        · Training for parent mentors and community mentors.
                        · Language resources available to school for effective and appropriate translations and communications with parents.
                        · Offer an area of the school labeled “Parent Resource Room.”
                        · Offer parents ideas on how to assist their kids with homework.

                        DOCUMENTING STUDENT PROGRESS:
                        Issue:
                        · How to reasonably show student progress for the Limited English speaker.

                        Recommendations:
                        · Mandatory beginning and ending year testing/assessment (for district purposes).
                        · Use multiple measures of assessment.
                        · Test in the native language when appropriate (when instruction is available in the native language).
                        · Desegregate data in multiple ways. (ethnically, SES, attendance, etc.)
                        · Provide and explain data to school sites (administrators/counselors and teachers) and patrons.
                        · Using data in developing school-improvement plan. (Provide before and after school enrichment, focus classroom instruction, summer academies, and transportation.)
                        · Chart student progress against him/herself.

                        CURRICULUM:
                        · All LEP students have an English Language Development (ELD)/ESL component (method of delivery can be site based).
                        · A uniform curriculum must be used throughout all schools in the district serving LEP students.
                        · The curriculum must “flow” from elementary to middle to high school.
                        · Foreign language versions of district “content” texts should be made available (only used if students are literate in language).
                        · District wide ESL curriculum with a Content Based focus. Because of disparity between students who exit OKCPS ESL programs and have success in content/mainstream classes.
                        · Oklahoma City Schools need to “adopt” a grade appropriate ESL text/materials that have a differentiated curriculum with a content-based focus, which is applied, uniformly throughout the district. (This would include using and applying the OKCPS developed ELD Curriculum and Differentiated Instructional Strategies.)
                        · Consider establishing center-type classrooms – each center focuses on an area of language development. The center participants rotate every 15 to 20 minutes.

                        PARENT-SCHOOL COMMUNITY ISSUES:
                        Issues:
                        · Lack of parental involvement.
                        · Need for more bilingual personnel.
                        · Better communications with parents.
                        · Coping with external issues that directly or indirectly affect the child.
                        · Trust factor (lack of) between parents and school.
                        · Improve partnerships/cooperation/communication between schools and community leaders/agencies.
                        · Better understanding of community at large issues.
                        · Lack of parent representative in PTA.
                        · Including parents at all levels (Were parents invited to today’s meeting?)
                        · Need for Hispanic parent friendly environment at school administration level.

                        Solutions:
                        · “Region 7” Presentation “Parents Know Your Rights”
                        · Involve Hispanic parents on all district level meetings. (Ex: Today’s Meeting/PTA.)
                        · Correspondence to Parents/Community in both Spanish/English on same paper.
                        · Readily available directions of community/social agencies/resources.
                        · Cooperation/Partnerships with agencies community/Federal and State.
                        · Counselor for students on cultural issues.
                        · Community Liaison
                        · Information Fairs
                        · One Stop Shop
                        · Remove barriers for increased parental participation (ex: child care, language, and location).
                        · Convert our schools in community agencies after hours.

                        STUDENT BEHAVIOR (Suspensions, referrals):
                        · Consistency and follow-up after suspensions.
                        · Better parent communication and education.
                        · Re-evaluation of bilingual assistance positions. Provide different levels of pay based on qualifications and experience.
                        · Fast tract college programs for teacher certification.
                        · Assign groups of students per teachers to: guide, counsel, mentor, etc… These programs are usually under an Advisory/Encore period.
                        · Additional alternative programs for “problem” students.
                        · “Pre-High School”
                        · ESL training for all teachers. (1-3 years) BICS and CALP (5-7years)
                        · Flex programs for secondary students – staggered starting and ending times.

                        STUDENT ATTENDANCE (Truancy):
                        Solutions:
                        · Evaluate attendance policies-relevant to District policies
                        · Consistent enforcement of truancy policies.
                        · Establishing an Organization with the primary focus of promoting the VALUE OF EDUCATION!!
                        · Penalize parents that don’t assist with the truancy of their children.
                        · Attach employment with student attendance.

                        POLICY & REGULATIONS:
                        · Gifted & Talented: Determine policy for gifted and talented programs in the school district- to ensure all students who qualify have access to resources.
                        · Testing: Advocate maximum exemption from State mandated testing for eligible students-but require all students to be tested for academic progress.
                        · Culture & Language Development/LEP: Publicize the new policy to the public and school personnel.

                        OKCPS Middle and High School Student input:
                        Professional Growth (Certified/Classified):
                        · ESL Teachers should be certified/endorsed by the state. Yearly professional development hours should include language training.



                        Recruitment (Teachers/Assistants):
                        · Advertise positions needed to Spanish speaking communities through any type of media, churches, and Hispanic business.

                        Resources:
                        · Spanish/English dictionaries should be provided to all students and faculty.
                        · Updated textbooks
                        · More computers with appropriate language development software
                        · Extra desks
                        · Bilingual textbooks
                        · Reference materials in each classroom
                        · Science equipment

                        Sensitivity Training:
                        No suggestions

                        Parental Involvement:
                        · Student encouragement thru newsletters and school bulletins
                        · Student will persuade their parent to come to school activities.
                        · Set up a Student-Parent Day
                        · Parents should go to school to check on student’s attendance, behavior, and academics.

                        Documenting Student Progress:
                        · One on one- student/teacher conference.
                        · Include the students when scheduling parent-teacher conferences

                        Curriculum:
                        · Teachers should follow objectives more strictly and make objectives clear to students.

                        Parent-school Community issues:
                        No suggestions.

                        Student Behavior (Suspensions, referrals):
                        · Strictly enforce ISS, suspensions and referrals.
                        · Separate misbehaved students.
                        · Have tutoring after school for the misbehaved students.

                        Student Attendance (Truancy):
                        · Enforce the five unexcused absence policy that results in an F.
                        · Kids ditch class because they are bored with the teachers. They are worried about failing an important test that they didn’t study for. They don’t want to go to class. They don’t want to get lectured if their teachers are griping all the time. They are just showing off for friends that are telling them that they are too chicken to ditch. They forgot their homework or class work and they know that their teachers are going to yell at them for it.
                        · Preventions of Truancy: Parents could call the school and make sure their kids are in class or the teachers could keep count of how many times they are out of class.

                        Policy & Regulations:
                        · They should be strictly enforced.
                        ___________________________________________________________

                        WHAT IS WRONG WITH THIS PICTURE?

                        WHAT DO YOU THINK IS WRONG WITH THIS PICTURE?

                        How would you handle this Jibaro

                        How would you explain to the teacher and the principal what is a Jibaro?
                        >> ¿Que es ser un Jíbaro Puertorriqueño?
                        >> por Orlando Vázquez (Don Jíbaro Criollo)

                        Who is Orlando Vazquez, Don Jibaro and what is his SES?
                        (Socio Economic Status, or personal material wealth?)

                        What do you do with his attitudes, skills and knowledge?

                        >> Espero que despues de leer esto, quede claro en sus mentes
                        >>que no hay vergüenza en ser jíbaro o ser campesino, ya que es
                        >>irrelevante pasar la vida tratando de probar a los incrédulos
                        >>quiénes somos, de donde venimos, o pa' donde vamos.

                        How do you propose to teach him and his children about US History and Culture, also about Cultural Pluralism in OK?

                        >> Cuando yo era niño viví en el campo. Mi mai es de Corozal y
                        >>mi difunto pai era de Comerío... Saqué ñame, yautía y malanga,
                        >>ordeñé vacas, ayudé a matar lechones, y me bañé en el rio cuando
                        >>cortaba clase en el campo de Bayamón... Tambien colgué tabaco,
                        >>corté caña, y SOBRETODO bebía café con leche en una taza hecha de
                        >>coco. Toco cuatro, guiro y maraca, y le meto mano al SEIS Chorreao,
                        >>Plena y Guaguancó y también al ROCK and ROLL, JAZZ si hay que
                        >>meterle mano.

                        How do you deal with the problem of stereotypes and Basic English literacy?

                        >> El estereotipo de que el Jibaro es un analfabeto, un bruto
                        >>que lo único que sabe hacer es cortar caña, criar gallinas y que
                        >>dice "asina" en vez de "así" es la imagen que estoy tratando de
                        >>eliminar. Esa etiqueta, puesta generalmente por aquellos que
                        >>arrogantemente se creen aristocráticos, o mejores... tiene el
                        >>maligno propósito de, no solamente sellar al campesino como idiota,
                        >>sino que se propone mantenerlo alli. Porque...
                        >>
                        >> "Un jíbaro inteligente es la pesadilla del aristócrata."
                        >> (Don Jibaro)
                        >>
                        >> Ser Jíbaro es más que esterotipos o etiquetas... es ser UNO
                        >>con la Tierra... amar y ser parte del terruño. Yo no sé que es lo
                        >>que te hace a tí un JÍBARO, pero si sé lo que me hace a mí.
                        >>Técnicamente, en realidad el verdadero JÍBARO, es aquel araucano
                        >>cazador de cabezas del Amazonas (de donde proviene el TAINO) que le
                        >>CORTABA la cabeza al su enemigo, la encogía y la guindaba de su
                        >>cintura como TROFEO. También esa imagen hay que erradicarla, pues
                        >>ESE no es el JÍBARO de PUERTO RICO...
                        >>
                        >> YO soy BORICUA, de sangre JÍBARA de PUERTO RICO, manchao de
                        >>plátano y criao con yuca y leche hervía. ESO soy y eso seré hasta
                        >>que me llegue mi sábado. No hay que ser bruto ni matón pa' ser
                        >>JIBARO. Eso es prejuicio y está mal. Yo soy JÍBARO, educao pues FUI
                        >>a la UNIVERSIDAD donde aprendí inglés y a traquetear con
                        >>computadoras! Pero la mancha de plátano NUNCA se me quita. Como
                        >>dije antes, tu eres lo que eres no importa donde estés. ¡Pa'
                        >>encima, Boricua!

                        DO YOU HAVE A PLAN?

                        SINCERELY,
                        PAZ PARA VIEQUES,
                        YAUTIA
                        >

                        P.S. Re. Your very biased views about Cuban Education, THIS IS FER SURE NOT WHAT FIDEL DOES WITH KIDS IN CUBA, I KNOW BECAUSE I HAVE RESEARCHED IT!

                        "I proposed a system not to different from what Fidel does with Cuban kids. Over there the kids are interned after a certain age in goverment camps for communist indoctrination and the parents are taking out of the loop. Believe it or not this could work for US kids who have highly unstable horrible homes. I believe some kids could be instructed in the basic fundamentals in special camps. Of course, this type of thing would never become a reality in the USA due to many reasons, but it is a thought."
                        ____________________________________________________________

                        so, please, do a little work, research a subject before you put your foot in your mouth!

                        Yautia

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          All I can say is that you broke Camano's record for the longest post ever.

                          If parents are not important in the education of children--------- How do you explain the success of Catholic schools when compared to public schools?


                          Los recuerdos suelen
                          Contarte mentiras



                          Stanley

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            It has to do with values, ethics, virtud, etc.

                            Originally posted by Stanley
                            All I can say is that you broke Camano's record for the longest post ever.

                            If parents are not important in the education of children--------- How do you explain the success of Catholic schools when compared to public schools?
                            ___________________________________________________________

                            It has to do with good teacher, good administrators that pick good teachers and everybody teachers kids about social and ethical values.

                            Ejemplo:
                            >>LOS SIETE RESPONSABLES DE LA DECADENCIA SOCIAL

                            >>Riqueza sin trabajo .
                            >>Placeres sin escrúpulos .
                            >>Conocimientos sin sabiduría .
                            >>Comercio sin moral.
                            >>Política sin idealismo .
                            >>Religión sin sacrificio.
                            >>Ciencia sin humanismo .
                            >>
                            >>GANDHI
                            >
                            So, it is true, you know, "It takes a village (un barrio) to raise (educate) a child.

                            What say you?

                            Sincerely,

                            La Yautia

                            PAZ PARA VIEQUES

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              Yautia:

                              I have seen kids from Viet-Nam graduate Valedictorian in poor school districts. They do so because they have an intact family. The family is everything, much more important than the village.

                              Regarding Catholic schools------- you should know that the parrochial school teachers are underpaid in relationship to public school teachers. Not only that------ on the average public school teachers have much more training and education than a parrochial school teacher. Many who teach in Catholic schools do so because they are not qualified to teach in the public school system where the pay is much better.


                              For example my daughter's chemistry teacher in high school was a retired phD chemist who simply wanted to work part time. The advanced mathematics teacher was a physicist who taught part time at the lunch hour. So the kids who wanted to be enrolled in that course had to skip lunch or eat early.

                              As you can well imagine these two could never teach in a public school--- they don;t have the proper credentials. However, their pupils do quite well.

                              The ratio of administrators to teachers is very tiny in Catholic schools whereas in the publi sector it is astronomical.

                              But, guess what? The parrochial schools do a better job because they tend to have kids that come from good homes. They also put emphasis on discipline and the kids must wear uniforms. They also teach ethics which is a whole lot more than just learning how to say a Hail Mary.

                              An intact home is everything! I cannot understand why educators do not see this.


                              Los recuerdos suelen
                              Contarte mentiras



                              Stanley

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                two cents...

                                while i think a "stable" family can certainly aid in one's educational success, it is important to examine the ways in which current educational structures encourage the success of some groups and the failure of others. i always laugh when i read things about latino parents' failure to stress the importance of education in their homes. i'm not sure this is the problem. i think that parents are very well aware of the importance of education. i believe that this criticism of latino parents has much more to do with their failure to assimilate to the ways of middle class (upper middle class?) america. it's not just about stressing the importance of education in one's home...it's also about learning the ways in which the system privileges people who participate in particular early-education programs (e.g., head start, pre-school, etc.), go to school in particular areas, and enroll in the enrichment courses that middle-class parents demand. we must remain critical of this system. the experiences of different groups (racial, ethnic, etc.) are so different from one another that it is important to examine each of them individually. thus, it is somewhat problematic to assume that chicanos and boricuas are dealing with the same issues. (it seems as though we've been grouping them together.)

                                i also have a problem with the unfailing commitment to meritocracy, that is, the belief that one will be rewarded according to one's work. women in this nation earn only three quarters of what men earn for performing the SAME jobs; people of color earn less than women. meritocracy does not hold up. this same problematic ideology undergirds assumptions about the "freedom" our country hopes to spread to other parts of the world.

                                right now i am a senior in college at one of the country's top liberal arts institutions. i'm majoring in linguistics and education. i am a first generation college student and, next fall, i will be the first in my family to enter a doctoral program (i've been accepted to harvard, stanford, and others!!) my father is puerto rican (his parents moved to NYC in 1945), and i attribute a great deal of my academic success to my heritage. i am proud of my people and i refuse to listen to uniformed assumptions about the ways in which we've failed to perform by US economic standards. our history of colonization is largely overlooked, yet deeply tied to issues of education and socioeconomics. let's take a step back and look at this from a more critical perspective.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X