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  • Racism is really about economics...

    Blacks and Latinos still face wealth of problems

    NY Daily News 10/19/04

    It's been well-documented that Hispanic and African-American workers earn about two-thirds the average wage of white workers.
    But that persistent "wage gap" pales when compared with our nation's huge racial and ethnic "wealth gap."

    In 2002, the median net worth for America's non-Hispanic white households was $88,651. For Hispanics, it was a mere $7,932, and for blacks just $5,988, according to a report released yesterday by the Washington-based Pew Hispanic Center.

    In other words, African-Americans and Hispanics - who now comprise more than 30% of our country's population - have less than one-tenth of the median household wealth of whites.

    Not only is that wealth gap enormous, it grew dramatically during the last recession.

    Black and Latino households lost more than one quarter of their net worth during 2000 and 2001, according to the report. At the same time, white households registered a small 2% increase.

    Even more amazing, the divide between the haves and have-nots is now greater within the African-American and Latino communities than it is among whites. According to the report, the top 5% of wealthy households possessed the following portion of total wealth in 2002: among Hispanics, 49.8%, blacks, 48%, and whites, 41.7%.

    Despite the economic boom of the 1990s, a stable middle class just has not developed among either minority group.

    Both presidential candidates, on those rare occasions when they mention the African-American and Hispanic communities, usually talk about creating more jobs or better schools. But this new report suggests that Democrats and Republicans alike are not coming up with policies to build long-term household wealth.

    To calculate that wealth, or "net worth," the Pew study added the value of all assets (cars, homes, bank and retirement accounts, stock investments and personal property) as reported by the Census Bureau and the Federal Reserve Bank, then subtracted all outstanding debts.

    Such wealth is extremely important because, unlike wages, it often gets passed on to other family members.

    It thus becomes "a means of providing security and status for future generations in the form of inheritances andfunds for higher education," the report noted.

    The biggest factor affecting the wealth gap, the report said, was homeownership.

    For most Americans, their most valuable asset is their home. But while 74.3% of whites owned a home in 2002, only 47.3% of Hispanics and 47.7% of African-Americans did.

    "If you're earning a middle-class salary but don't own a house with a white picket fence, you're always in a precarious financial position," said Roberto Suro, director of the Pew Hispanic Center.

    Hispanics also are at a disadvantage, Suro said, because so many are concentrated in places like metropolitan New York and Los Angeles, where housing prices are among the highest in the nation.

    With a young population and a large proportion of recent immigrants, Hispanics also tend to be at the lower end of the wealth acquisition stage.

    More than one-fourth of Hispanics and more than one-third of blacks had zero or negative net worth in 2002, compared with slightly more than one-tenth of whites, the report said.

    Finally, the report noted, since Hispanic immigrants send an estimated $30 billion a year back to their home countries to support family members, that is money that is lost to household wealth-building in this country.


    Originally published on October 19, 2004

    by Juan Gonzalez

  • #2
    Waneko,
    This is why I am a fan of yours on pr.com. Because you use, logic and stats and reason in figuring out why something might be happening. And as such you are a clear thinker.

    Yes there are many factors to racism. And economic disadvantage is one of many of the consequences of it. Nowadays you have people who are just confused about how to cope with the issue. You have the Civil Rights Act of 1964 that makes it illegal to discriminate against a person due to their race, creed, national original or ethnicity. But is it being enforced? According to many Civil Rights organizations the answer is NO!! The Republican conservatives have been busy watering down the funds and the abilities of Civil Rights enforcement for a while now. And it is very difficult to enforce and prove in court in general. Sexual harrasment, racism and sex or age discrimination by employers, mortgage and real estate people, educators, and private sector industries is VERY HARD to prove. Due to many complex factors. And as such many cases with legitimate claims of discrimination and racism never see justice or the light of day. They never get to first base. Too many factors involved. You have to have money, the political and social will (which many conservatives undermine in their communities) and you have to put a lot of people's livelihood's in jeopardy if it is something systemic. ANd people tend to conform to the path of least resistance. I mean how many people you know would give depositions to lawyers trying to prove racism and or sexism or ageism or sexual harrasment and etc.? And risk losing their jobs? Or having a hostile work environment to help out some employee who is most probably been retaliated against for complaining in the first place? You can't legislate and prosecute effectively subtle racism or even overt racism many times. Just look at the statistics with federal discrimination cases. The vast majority just don't get to first base. And the reason is simple. Many times the poltical climate dictates enforcement or not. And lately it has been either wishy washy conservative democrats or hardline conservatives and neither qualify as RADICAL or real left. There you have it. Not enough pressure socially to enforce. You won't get it done. Punto.

    Comment


    • #3
      Waneko

      Waneko, As Hispanics we have our set of problems in in succes marketplace. But don't group us with the American Blacks who have more political power than we do. While they like to make us think that we are together, they look out for their own. Therefore, we Hispanics need to fight our own battle because of the above reality.

      Puerto Ricans of African descent better not dare to speak Spanish in front of the American Black person whose culture is so different than our Puerto Rican and that of Other Hispanics.

      We work to love everyone but these realities in our existance just stand out.

      Comment


      • #4
        Rivera

        There was no "grouping" being done by the article, but it does point out the thing that blacks and hispanics have in common in the U.S. Both are poor. You may be correct if you think that the causes of it may be different for both groups but the common denominator still exists.

        As for blacks having more political power, I believe that
        no one can really have political power without economic power. A few loud voices, to me, doesn't constitute power. Even a higher percentage of registered voters doesn't exactly translate into political power either.

        The point I am trying to make with the article is that racism is institutional, and not someone's personal anecdotes which seem to take up a lot of space on this board.

        Comment


        • #5
          Hmmm..let's see if I can put this in as simply as possible.

          Racism is based on RACE. Hence the root, "RACE".

          Comment


          • #6
            Waneko

            Yes racism is institutionalized and yes the blacks and so called 'hispanics' are poor people as a whole. And yes, that is part of the reason why race or ethnicity and economics are so closely tied to each other.

            Yes, most of the bull one is reading on this board doesn't cope with class struggle. It all degenerates to stupidity and personal anecdotes,such as, which soap opera produced by some idiot producers, and underwritten by corporate America. How so and so is a millionaire actor, or a tv talk show host that is the powerful owner that is in the top Fortune 500 list, or Colin Powell or Condi Rice, or black congresspeople is absolute proof how successful the minorities have become in the USA. They don't look at the big picture. That as a whole, there are the haves vs the have nots. And the have nots due to lack of economic inequalities don't have the same clout in the society. We aren't the power brokers. Punto.

            Why we are not is another cup of tea. Some say cuz of lack of education, and or lack of having values in which education is the top priority, others it is the language barriers that keeps them from becoming the next Donald Trump or Oprah, in which you see the dumb univision commercial in which an immigrant learns English and overnight becomes a millionaire. Lol. Others it is because they don't have the right business plan. But whatever it is the reality is that the vast majority of the AA's and the Latinos in the USA don't live with high incomes. And aren't the power elite, either in the private sector, the public sector or reflect their numbers in the decision making process that shapes the society. And that is the truth. Race and class is interlinked. But the more overriding reality is class. Socioeconomic class. A poor person is poor and that is that. They share similar limitations, no matter what race they are. If they are wealthy and part of the power elite they have a different set of circumstances. And as a whole the AA's don't get the slice of the Apple pie the way they would like. Neither do the hispanos. Punto y se acabo.

            I don't believe that it is due to inferior genes. I think it is systemic. And that is where Rivera and I will part ways. He blames the people themselves for their lack of 'success' and I think it is a systemic problem, designed to keep the same group always in the driver's seat. Punto. Thanks Waneko.

            Suki.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by oppressed_oppressor
              Hmmm..let's see if I can put this in as simply as possible.

              Racism is based on RACE. Hence the root, "RACE".

              Ooooooookay

              So what is the role of the "ism" and how does it impact the word as a whole?

              Comment


              • #8
                Suki

                Yes you are right, everyone wants to find the quick and easy answer to why blacks and Latinos are overrepresented among the poor in the U.S. Everyone's personal reality is different, but few will acknowledge the role history has on people's perceptions and how those perceptions shape who we are today. We will never get anywhere judging someone's personal reality, but the day we acknowledge the fact that our perceptions are shaped by the history, is the day we have control over our perceptions and hence our behavior, in this case, as it pertain to race. Then we can improve how we see people who are different from us. Take care.

                Comment


                • #9
                  rac·ism ( P ) Pronunciation Key (rszm)
                  n.
                  The belief that race accounts for differences in human character or ability and that a particular race is superior to others.
                  Discrimination or prejudice based on race.

                  --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                  racist adj. & n.


                  racism

                  n 1: the prejudice that members of one race are intrinsically superior to members of other races 2: discriminatory or abusive behavior towards members of another race [syn: racialism, racial discrimination]

                  "ISM"

                  The suffix -ism is a noun suffix. That is, when added to words or word roots, -ism forms nouns. It comes from the Greek noun suffix -ismos and means roughly “the act, state, or theory of.” Nouns that end in -ism often have related verbs that end in -ize (criticism/criticize), related agent nouns that end in -ist (optimism/optimist), and related adjectives that end in -istic (optimistic).



                  Hope that helped you out there, Stalin.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by oppressed_oppressor
                    rac·ism ( P ) Pronunciation Key (rszm)
                    n.
                    The belief that race accounts for differences in human character or ability and that a particular race is superior to others.
                    Discrimination or prejudice based on race.

                    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                    racist adj. & n.


                    racism

                    n 1: the prejudice that members of one race are intrinsically superior to members of other races 2: discriminatory or abusive behavior towards members of another race [syn: racialism, racial discrimination]

                    "ISM"

                    The suffix -ism is a noun suffix. That is, when added to words or word roots, -ism forms nouns. It comes from the Greek noun suffix -ismos and means roughly “the act, state, or theory of.” Nouns that end in -ism often have related verbs that end in -ize (criticism/criticize), related agent nouns that end in -ist (optimism/optimist), and related adjectives that end in -istic (optimistic).



                    Hope that helped you out there, Stalin.
                    Well, there you have it. What better evidence that racism is the current economic situation of blacks and Latinos?

                    They key part of the definition is the dicriminatory and and abusive treatment. Particularly the discrimination which has collectively (your favorite word) kept people of color from closing the economic gap.

                    So yes, the “the act, state, or theory of.” race in the U.S. is that blacks and Latinos are still overrepresented among the poor. The acts being the discrimination I talked about, the state being what the article talks about, and the theory being the connection between the acts and the state of race today in the U.S. Thanks for helping me make my point.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      ummm....NO.


                      You seem to have missed that little word in there spelled R-A-C-E.

                      Only a twisted leftist could read the word RACE and see the word MONEY. You can spin 'til you puke, but you cannot change the meaning of words to fit your ridiculous ideology.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Waneko

                        Waneko, sometimes I think that a significant number of Puerto ricans Z(in the US) and a significant number of American Blacks, don't work hard to achieve high school, and higher education. There is a bigger price to pay for these attitudes which often guarantee lower success.

                        Having no idean how to improve themselves economically, they look to the government for some handout that will improve their life. Some are extremely good at manipulating the system and manage to live well! Hard

                        Puerto Ricans and Amirican Blacks who attain educatuon and/or a trade are working and making good salaries and don't need the government to give them anything.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Racism+Economics go hand in hand!

                          [QUOTE]Originally posted by Rivera33
                          [B]Waneko, sometimes I think that a significant number of Puerto ricans Z(in the US) and a significant number of American Blacks, don't work hard to achieve high school, and higher education. There is a bigger price to pay for these attitudes which often guarantee lower success.

                          Having no idean how to improve themselves economically, they look to the government for some handout that will improve their life. Some are extremely good at manipulating the system and manage to live well! Hard

                          Puerto Ricans and Amirican Blacks who attain educatuon and/or a trade are working and making good salaries and don't need the government to give them anything.
                          ______________________________________________________________

                          OK, so there are a significant number of Puerto Ricans in the US and in Puerto Rico who are either not interested or do not see the benefit of a High School Diploma, es mas, I would say there are those that do not see the benefit of High School, a B.A., an M.A. or a PhD. and in some areas, this makes a lot of sense to me. In other words, in some places education does not mean a whole lot of beans!

                          There are those that have very little education, but still they have learned to survive learning a trade, or in the service industry, or just keeping as many part time jobs as they can find and often put in 80 or more hours a week just to make ends meet, I know plenty of those!

                          But you know, if you think about race and economics there is a very close connection, there is no doubt in my mind. Take for example, something I am very much interested in, the economics of Vieques. Believe me, the people of Vieques have proved that they do not want "hand outs" the Navy tried that and they failed! But here is a community that one can say is Black and Poor, and I would venture to say that they are not lazy, and I would say, in general, that they are not going to spend the rest of their lives, (with some exceptions, of course) chasing a diploma to get a job in Vieques.

                          I am one of those that believes in sustainable development. But the situation of Vieques is very unique. So I suggest that education can become the substitute for the Military in Puerto Rico, and specifically, in Vieques. For every dollar that the US Military spends, if you convert that dollar to education, it renders a benefit 10 fold. $1.00 military dollar is worth $10 education dollars. So we can make economic development in all the areas where the US has vacated into educational institutions from Day Care to PhDs and do it with the technology today in Vieques.
                          Race and class are at the heart of this discussion. Those of us who fought hard to get rid of the Navy must continue to be vigilant. "...we must be steadfast in our struggle, attentive to any plan to continue using and abusing Vieques..." We have to let people know that The Vieques Movement is Still Kicking!!!!

                          When the Navy Bid Vieques Adiós, it was not the end of the battle for the people of Vieques, many of them black, many of them fishermen. (One fisherwoman). True the Navy were
                          on May 1, 2003; transferring most of its exercises to Florida and North Carolina, and, this is important: handing the land over to the Interior Department. Not the people of Vieques!

                          We have not really dealt with all the civil and human rights violations against the people in Vieques, (many of them not only from Vieques and the rest of Puerto Rico but also from the US "mainland").

                          Nilda Medina, spokesperson for the Committee for the Rescue and Development of Vieques (CRDV), is still active and represents many of the feelings of the women in Vieques. "We do not trust the Navy or the Federal Government, so we must be steadfast in our struggle, attentive to any plan to continue using and abusing Vieques."

                          Protests had been intense since David Sanes, a civilian security guard, was killed in a botched April 1999 live fire bombing run by Marine Corps jets, though the demonstrations occurred sporadically since the Navy expropriated from residents two-thirds of the 52-square-mile island in 1941.

                          How did the people of Vieques survive all those years? Mostly by cleaning and washing for the Navy families living in Vieques. The men survived by invading the waste dumps and military junk the left behind. They cleaned and polished the bullets they found, they recycled the military stuff the Navy had discarded.

                          But now, and in spite of all the more than 1,000 protesters arrested since 1999 whose claims that the exercises damaged the environment and harmed the health of the island's 9,300 residents, the Navy and the US has refused to deal with this very real issue!

                          What to do? Sustainable development requires that we teach people (education is economic development, in this model, remember?) all about hazardous waste and ecological clean-up, it is a beautiful island, they can do lots with it. Many feel the first thing should be developing turismo.

                          But what kind of turismo?

                          The Navy has used shells containing depleted uranium, napalm, and other controversial substances, while papers released last year under the Freedom of Information Act revealed that in experiments held during May 1969, the Navy exposed some residents of Vieques to triocyl phosphate, a chemical related to problems of the skin, eyes, the respiratory tract and to cancer in animals.

                          Puerto Rican and independent studies have indicated both elevated levels of several contaminants in the water, food chain and population, and elevated rates of cancer, asthma, skin conditions and birth defects among the inhabitants of Vieques, though direct linkages between pollution and health are difficult to prove.

                          Embattled EPA head Christie Whitman has promised that, "We're going to do it right, and we're going to do it as fast as we can," but the Vieques cleanup in these times of budget cuts and environmental deregulation will likely require the same kind of pressure from activists, Puerto Rico's Governor, and Puerto Rico's people both on the Island of Vieques and the rest of Puerto Rico. In addition we need the Diaspora in the US and the rest of the world.

                          Sila María Calderón, is on her way out, and Puerto Rican politicians in the U.S., are not saying much about economic development in Vieques, Puerto Rico or in the USA; Es mas, we can't even forced George W. Bush to comply with his 2001 post-election promise to fix the problem in Vieques.

                          So, how about becoming a certified specialist in dealing with depleted Uranium (wait until we start hearing what that is doing in Iraq and what it will do to the US Vets with Post Traumatic Stress when they come back from Iraq)

                          I can see the research already: "Depleted Uranium: the Vieques-Iraq Connection!"

                          So back to the issues: What do we need to do first, get people who specialize in nuclear medicine for all the cancer, respiratory problems, ecological impact of contaminants, esp. as it relates to food and water to be consumed by the natives and all those educational turists we need on Vieques. Then there is deep sea fishing and study of marine life, it is very much in peril, world wide. Think about it from an economic point of view, do you really want to sell a lot of fish full of mercury to tourists?

                          Remember the issue of "The Enemy of the People?" There is where we have to begin!

                          And if all that has nothing to do with race and economic development, Que Venga Dios y Lo Vea!!!!

                          Yautia



                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Rivera


                            What you say is true, but it's not the only factor that created the stats Waneko posted. All the other groups, including the so-called whites have highschool drop-outs.

                            Though I agree that one has to work to achive any thing in live. The perceptions of any given indevidual/group does indeed influence their likelyhood(sp) toward success.

                            Here in California, there are many Mexican-Americans that just don't work at their education because they feel. whats the point. Whity is not going to give me a job. I'm a brown man/woman and so I'm not going to get a good paying job.

                            This defeatice attitude is encourged by the system. I know you are saying it's not true. But give it a thought, does it benefit our economy to keep a large segment of the population uneducated and low wage erners?

                            Corporations and farms need the grunts to be there in large numbers, as a commodity(sp) to help off-set the costs of buisness. So who better then the spic, wet-back and the nigros to do this?
                            Pro-Black, Pro-Diversity. " Live and let Live"

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Racism+Economics go hand in hand!

                              Originally posted by Corvo

                              What you say is true, but it's not the only factor that created the stats Waneko posted. All the other groups, including the so-called whites have highschool drop-outs.

                              Though I agree that one has to work to achive any thing in live. The perceptions of any given indevidual/group does indeed influence their likelyhood(sp) toward success.

                              Here in California, there are many Mexican-Americans that just don't work at their education because they feel. whats the point. Whity is not going to give me a job. I'm a brown man/woman and so I'm not going to get a good paying job.

                              This defeatice attitude is encourged by the system. I know you are saying it's not true. But give it a thought, does it benefit our economy to keep a large segment of the population uneducated and low wage erners?

                              Corporations and farms need the grunts to be there in large numbers, as a commodity(sp) to help off-set the costs of buisness. So who better then the spic, wet-back and the negros to do this?
                              ____________________________________________________________

                              You are correct, the corporations and agro-business needs the grunts, and where do we get a lot of the grunts that are not US citizens? From Latin America. How does the US keep a large, fresh supply of these grunts, through violence and oppression of these countries. Let's look at two Black Republics: Haiti and Venezuela. Now we know what they did in Haiti, now it is time for Venezuela. They are busy setting the stage for another coup. Then, we will blame the Latin Americans, of course!

                              Here is an article by Juan Pérez Cabral a few months ago which proves the point of race and economics:

                              The Us has been constant in setting up puppet governments in our Hemisphere, and across the world, (esp. Africa).

                              MARCH 5, 2004. Jean-Claude "Baby Doc" Duvalier, the dictator who ruled Haiti for twenty-nine years, put himself forward Tuesday as a candidate to replace ousted President Jean-Bertrand Aristide. He told CBS reporter Michele Gillen from exile in France, that Haiti "is my country ... I'm ready to put myself at the disposal of the Haitian people."

                              Baby Doc is known for torturing and killing prisoners in the presidential palace even on the eve of his flight from Haiti in 1986. The return of the unemployed dictator seems as likely as the more peaceful democratic era the United States is promising after making their kid-glove contributions to the current Haitian coup.

                              Pressured by the U.S., rebel leader Guy Philippe says he has ordered his fighters to lay down arms, but deaths continue on the island, many of them retaliatory killings. Hospitals are full of women raped or assaulted. Doctors are reportedly bracing for an additional influx of assault victims over the weekend.

                              The U.S. may not be able to stuff the genie of violence back into the bottle. There are both the armed pro-Aristide gangs that are fighting for their lives, and, according to The New York Times, members of the rebel army collectively responsible for the massacres of thousands in earlier regimes. Typical are Louis-Jodel Chamblain and Jean-Pierre Baptiste, two former leaders of Fraph, the Haitian Front for Advancement and Progress. "Fraph was an instrument of terror wielded by the military junta that overthrew Haiti's embattled president, Jean-Bertrand Aristide, in 1991. It killed thousands over the next three years."

                              The Economist predicted March 4 that the U.S. has opened the door to "a repeat of the refugee crisis of the mid-1990's, when tens of thousands of Haitians fleeing violence washed up on the shores of America and other Caribbean islands."

                              Worse, The Economist expects the coup to undermine shaky democracies in the region, particularly Venezuela. One banner reading "Bye bye Aristide, Chávez you're next" was carried during last Sunday's demonstrations demanding a referendum to recall President Hugo Chávez.

                              The Bush White House has already supported one quick coup against the democratically elected Chávez who persistently thwarts U.S. oil policy maneuvering, and further irritates the Yanquis by associating with that other Caribbean gadfly, Cuba's Fidel Castro.

                              Already, White House spokesman, Scott McClellan, said Tuesday that the Bush administration urges Venezuela's electoral council to "allow the people's voices to be heard" in the recall movement, and called for a "peaceful, democratic and constitutional resolution of the political crisis in Venezuela," both statements echoing previous rhetoric about Haiti.

                              Unsurprisingly, President Chávez responded by accusing the United States of meddling, and warning that Venezuela was not Haiti. Not yet, anyway. One of the main players in the 2002 coup against Chávez was Gustavo Cisneros, Venezuela's wealthiest man and sometime fishing partner of the first President Bush.

                              It doesn't matter that Chávez is autocratic. So is his opposition. The main thing is — U.S. hands off. Venezuelans have a constitutional process to get rid of Chávez if they want to. It should be respected.

                              • From His First Day in Office, Bush Was Ousting Aristide
                              • Chávez is next in line.

                              My question is why does the US pick on these "poor third world" dictators or democratically elected leaders? Why does not the US government go after the big boys: China, Russia and Japan, if they feel that the trade is not what it should be: Ala Milton Friedman, privatize everything or we will kill you, model? Why not take on the European Union who supported Iraq and is still upset over the US Iraq little war over there? They refuse to send troops and money, and what is worse, even the Brits (not Tony Blare!), want to meddle in US politics to get the Arbustos out of office in the USA!

                              And speaking of Tony Blair, he says that when he gets a letter from a mom who has lost a son there, he has his doubts. George Bush, naw, he says, he has no doubts!

                              Yes, sir. This is all about Race, Ethnicity, Social Class and Economics. Garantizao!

                              Yautia

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