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Puerto Rico y Mejico: dos paises consumidos por el narcotrafico

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  • #16
    Setting the record straight

    Let me set the record straight about something that was said in one of the latter posts. All of persons doing prison terms, persons doing 1 complete or more years are there for FELONIES or MULTIPLE MISDEMEANORS where the total sentences add up to more than 1 year. In county jails the marjority of detainees [and also sentenced persons] are there for FELONIES and a larger portiion are there for misdemeanors. This I can attest to, after over 500 investigations [involving over 1000 defendants charged with every crime you can think of ] that I have been involved in the last 20 years which include offenders from all over this country and many from outside the US [ie Extradition cases] I know that most misdemeanants dont last long in jail, [usually less than 30 days]; The vast majority plead guilty [90 plus percent]. The majority of persons in prisons and jails DO present of risk of danger to the community or themselves. To suggest that anything more than a minority dont belong in jail or prison is to not know what one is talikng about. The fact is most judges know when an offender needs drug treatment versus a jail cell. Similarly, prosecutors, despite common beliefs to the contrary, are NOT interested in making low level drug cases because they can and do clog up court calenders [and jails]. However, what do you do with recidivist misdemeanants [and felons] who just wont get or comply with treatment, cut him or her loose back into the community? [Do often do so anyway] Maybe you are comfortable with this person in your neighborhood but I am not.

    The truth is drug addiction treatment for the most serious addicts is successful in less than 50 percent of the cases, and any drug addiction therapist understands abstinence by addicts is usually followed by relapse, and only about half of that 50 percent ultimately clean up for a sustained number of years. Even "clean" ex-addicts will still call themselves addicts because they understand that they can relapse if they are not careful.

    Finally, I haven't even touched the issue of the mentally ill who are also addicted. Alone they can fill up every jail cell in this country.

    I am skeptical, but maybe limited legalization is worth a try; at least that is the current thinking by many. Notwithstanding, dont start jumping up and closing the prisons and jails too quickly because I suspect they will still have plenty of business. I dont think that the target audience whose lives we endeavor to better in this effort are so attuned to their own betterment as we want to believe.
    Last edited by Sonambulo; 23rd August 2009, 10:17.

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    • #17
      Don't legalize, medicate.

      Don Sonambulo, I realize you do have more experience with these matters than most of us and have dealt with this type of problem for a lifetime, and I respect your opinion; but don't you think that after spending billions and billions in this so-called "War on drugs", it really has very little to show except full prisions and a history of recidivism on the part of the addicts that it really merits a new bold look at this problem and it's solutions? I'm really for "medicating" drugs, not a straight legalization of the poisons, and since this "War" was lost a long time ago I'm ready to hear new approaches to this matter.

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      • #18
        De acuerdo

        Anyone who has had any significant contact with the justice system, specifically as it to relates to drug prosecutions, for any significant period, knows that the system has failed to “win” the “war” on drugs. The proof is in the kilos. However, there have been hundreds of thousands of INDIVIDUAL victories because specific persons have been taken off the streets by the justice system, and unfortunately by street justice. Regrettably many others have stepped up to replace those taken out of circulation. I note that the harshest criticism about the failure of the so called drug war has come from former DEA agents. They lament about the failure of the political leadership to address the reluctance by the leaders of the source countries to take the problem seriously and reduce the corruption in source countries that has allowed the situation to worsen for both countries. Other retired agents of the drug war also point to the failure in significantly reducing the lack of resources that are provided to agents in this country to address their efforts and how the “suits” in Washington have and continue to use the drug war for political purposes.

        Personally, I am not opposed to anything that is constructive. But the devil in in the details and specifics. You speak of medicating drugs; what exactly does that mean?, and how would the specifics of the drug policy read?. You’re a teacher and a musician and I am sure have run into plenty of addicts. How likely are they to abandon, say their street heroin habit, and switch to a regulated version of heroin. Perhaps you may be aware of the failure of methadone to relieve the addiction of heroin addicts. You probably know that many addicts continue to use heroin while getting their manteca on the street.

        Again, if we are talking about “medical marihauna” what exact would this mean. Are we talking about GOVERNMENT growers; will they create the Bureau of Cannabis Production; will they seek to alter it to lessen the potency. Will they contract the production out; who will oversee the production, the FDA, DEA, FBI -[who ultimately has oversight over the DEA via a memorandum agreement]. What about the issue of states rights. Look at the legalization of marijuana happening in California; how would a federal drug policy deal with this issue of state rights and drug legalization. Will they seek to expand drug courts?. Who will pay for the bureaucracy that the legislation will create. How much additional money will be appropriated for the increase in drug dependency, at least in the short term.. There are a lot of questions that would have to be addressed in an effort to legalize street drugs. Clearly, the drug policies to legalize drugs would be a legal, practical, and logistical nightmare.

        Again I think you raise a valid point about the need to try something else. However the practical, legal, and mechanical considerations are going to be almost as great as the legalization itself.

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        • #19
          De acuerdo

          Anyone who has had any significant contact with the justice system, specifically as it to relates to drug prosecutions, for any significant period, knows that the system has failed to “win” the “war” on drugs. The proof is in the kilos. However, there have been hundreds of thousands of INDIVIDUAL victories because specific persons have been taken off the streets by the justice system, and unfortunately by street justice. Regrettably many others have stepped up to replace those taken out of circulation. I note that the harshest criticism about the failure of the so called drug war has come from former DEA agents. They lament about the failure of the political leadership to address the reluctance by the leaders of the source countries to take the problem seriously and reduce the corruption in source countries that has allowed the situation to worsen for both countries. Other retired agents of the drug war also point to the failure in significantly reducing the lack of resources that are provided to agents in this country to address their efforts and how the “suits” in Washington have and continue to use the drug war for political purposes.

          Personally, I am not opposed to anything that is constructive. But the devil in in the details and specifics. You speak of medicating drugs; what exactly does that mean?, and how would the specifics of the drug policy read?. You’re a teacher and a musician and I am sure have run into plenty of addicts. How likely are they to abandon, say their street heroin habit, and switch to a regulated version of heroin. Perhaps you may be aware of the failure of methadone to relieve the addiction of heroin addicts. You probably know that many addicts continue to use heroin while getting their manteca on the street.

          If we are talking about “medical marihauna” what exact would this mean. Are we talking about GOVERNMENT growers; will they create the Bureau of Cannabis Production; will they seek to alter it to lessen the potency. Will they contract the production out; who will oversee the production, the FDA, DEA, FBI -[who ultimately has oversight over the DEA via a memorandum agreement]. What about the issue of states rights. Look at the legalization of marijuana happening in California; how would a federal drug policy deal with this issue of state rights and drug legalization. Will they seek to expand drug courts?. Who will pay for the bureaucracy that the legislation will create. How much additional money will be appropriated for the increase in drug dependency, at least in the short term.. There are a lot of questions that would have to be addressed in an effort to legalize street drugs. Clearly, the drug policies to legalize drugs would be a legal, practical, and logistical nightmare.

          I think you raise a valid point about the need to try something else. However the practical, legal, and mechanical considerations are going to be almost as great as the legalization itself.

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          • #20
            Spammer

            The above posting is SPAM and could be harmful to your network. Please remove the post and the poster.

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            • #21
              I have notified PR.com many times about this spammers and nothing seems to be done about them.

              As you said, the problem lies in developing strategies which take into account all the interests of the parties involved. The Nehterlands tried the medication of drugs and I don't think it has worked in terms of reducing the amount of addicts consumming these drugs. It has decreased significantly the criminal elements associated with the trade and at the same time it has created a heaven for "drug tourists" ( mostly from the U.S.)who travel to the Netherlands because of their liberal laws on drug consumption. Maybe the idea is that once you get rid of the bulk of the medicated addicts, the money saved will be used for aggresive educational campaigns to prevent people from falling into these vices. I believe this approach has worked for tobacco, where all groups of society, except young women, have reduced significantly their use of this drug.

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              • #22
                Yes I wish they take care of the damn Bots once and for all!

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                • #23
                  Nuevamente, lo presentado aqui se ha multiplicado vertiginosamente en sus dimensiones, y al presente son miles los muertos y miles más heridos por la actividad de estos grupos delictivos en ambos países y los gobiernos no hayan forma de tomar cartas en el asunto.

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