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Buddhist Wisdom!

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  • Buddhist Wisdom!

    Better
    than if there were thousands
    of meaningless verses is
    one
    meaningful
    verse
    that on hearing
    brings peace.

    And better than chanting hundreds
    of meaningless verses is
    one Dhamma-saying
    that on hearing
    brings peace.


    -Dhammapada, 8, translated by Thanissaro Bhikkhu.

  • #2
    The impulse "I want" and the impulse "I'll have"--lose them! That is where most people get stuck--without those, you can use your eyes to guide you through this suffering state.[b]

    -Sutta Nipata

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    • #3
      Mindfulness is the miracle by which we master and restore ourselves. Consider, for example: a magician who cuts his body into many parts and places each part in a different region--hands in the south, arms in the east, legs in the north, and then by some miraculous power lets forth a cry which reassembles whole every part of his body. Mindfulness is like that--it is the miracle which can call back in a flash our dispersed mind and restore it to wholeness so that we can live each minute of life.[b]

      -Thich Nhat Hanh, "Miracle of Mindfulness"

      Comment


      • #4
        My favorite one.

        Do not go after the past,
        Nor lose yourself in the future.
        For the past no longer exists,
        And the future is not yet here.
        By looking deeply at things just as they are,
        In this moment, here and now,
        The seeker lives calmly and freely.
        You should be attentive today,
        For waiting until tomorrow is too late.
        Death can come and take us by surprise--
        How can we gainsay it?
        The one who knows
        How to live attentively
        Night and day
        Is the one who knows
        The best way to be independent.
        [b]

        -Bhaddekaratta Sutra

        Comment


        • #5
          So don't be in a hurry and try to push or rush your practice. Do your meditation gently and gradually step by step. In regard to peacefulness, if you become peaceful, then accept it; if you don't become peaceful, then accept that also. That's the nature of the mind. We must find our our own practice and persistently keep at it.[b]

          -Ajahn Chah, "Bodhinyana"

          Comment


          • #6
            Those who attain perfect wisdom are forever inspired by the conviction that the infinitely varied forms of this world, in all their relativity, far from being a hindrance and a dangerous distraction to the spiritual path, are really a healing medicine. Why? Because by the very fact that they are interdependent on each other and therefore have no separate self, they express the mystery and the energy of all-embracing love. Not just the illumined wise ones but every single being in the interconnected world is a dweller in the boundless infinity of love.[b]

            -Prajnaparmita

            Comment


            • #7
              Seeing error where there is none,
              & no error where there is,
              beings adopting wrong views
              go to a bad destination.

              But knowing error as error,
              and non-error as non-,
              beings adopting right views
              go to a good
              destination.
              [b]

              -Dhammapada, 22, translated by Thanissaro Bhikkhu.

              Comment


              • #8
                If we are peaceful, if we are happy, we can smile and blossom like a flower, and everyone in our family, our entire society, will benefit from our peace.[b]

                -Thich Nhat Hanh, "Being Peace"

                Comment


                • #9
                  Happy is he who lives contented in solitude, is well-versed in the Doctrine and who has realized it. Happy is he who lives in this world free from ill-will, and is benevolent towards all beings. Happy is he who lives in this world free from passion, has overcome sensual enjoyment, and who has attained mastership over the conceit of "I am." This indeed is the highest happiness.[b]

                  -Udana 2.1

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    It's not good,
                    the doing of the deed
                    that, once it's done,
                    you regret,
                    whose result you reap crying,
                    your face in tears.

                    It's good,
                    the doing of the deed,
                    that, once it's done,
                    you don't regret,
                    whose result you reap gratified,
                    happy at heart.
                    [b]

                    -Dhammapada, 5, translated by Thanissaro Bhikkhu.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      The one who beholds that which has become as become
                      Passes beyond that becoming
                      And is released from craving for sensation.
                      In that which really is, he understands becoming.
                      Free from longing for birth or death,
                      He finds the true meaning of the end of becoming.
                      [b]

                      -Itivuttaka Sutta

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        You could, for a hundred years,
                        live in a forest
                        tending a fire,
                        or
                        pay a single moment's homage
                        to one person,
                        self-cultivated.
                        Better than a hundred years of sacrifices
                        would that act of homage be.
                        [b]

                        -Dhammapada, 8, translated by Thanissaro Bhikkhu.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          And So Ecuajay?

                          Originally posted by Ecuajey
                          [B]You could, for a hundred years,
                          live in a forest
                          tending a fire,
                          or
                          pay a single moment's homage
                          to one person,
                          self-cultivated.
                          Better than a hundred years of sacrifices
                          would that act of homage be.


                          -Dhammapada, 8, translated by Thanissaro Bhikkhu.
                          Ecuajay;

                          So you are a Buddist, who pours out the thoughts of the Buddha, without waiting for anyone to reply. That Mister is quite rude of you, because this is a discussion forum in Philosophy, and not a soap box of religionist indoctrination.

                          Have a Good day,
                          EddieR
                          E.1: TWO STEPS FORWARD, ONE STEP BACK - V.I. Lenin

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Eddier1

                            Originally posted by Eddier1
                            So you are a Buddist, who pours out the thoughts of the Buddha, without waiting for anyone to reply. That Mister is quite rude of you, because this is a discussion forum in Philosophy, and not a soap box of religionist indoctrination.
                            Those who want to reply, may do so. Those who wish not to, will be able to read this thread with words of wisdom. Whether they agree with them or not, or interpret them a different way then I would, could be the beginning of a friendly discussion. I do acknowledge this is a forum for discussion, and if people want to discuss about Buddhism or any other topic of my interest, they can. I already laid the groundwork for discussion on the interpretation of these short Buddhist words of wisdom so that all may enjoy. I don't think that is rude. If you think so, that is your opinion, in which I respect, as long as it doesn't start trouble between us. That is not my intention nor the reason why I am in this forum. Take care.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              that reminds me of another verse

                              Originally posted by Ecuajey
                              Better
                              than if there were thousands
                              of meaningless verses is
                              one
                              meaningful
                              verse
                              that on hearing
                              brings peace.

                              And better than chanting hundreds
                              of meaningless verses is
                              one Dhamma-saying
                              that on hearing
                              brings peace.


                              -Dhammapada, 8, translated by Thanissaro Bhikkhu.
                              It reminds me of one from the Bible:

                              "If I speak in the tongues of men and of angels, but have not love, I am only a resounding gong or a clanging cymbal. If I have the gift of prophecy and can fathom all mysteries and all knowledge, and if I have a faith that can move mountains but have not love, I am nothing." 1 Corinthians 13:1,2

                              Comment

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