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Puerto Rico Drug Addiction Turning Resident Users Into Zombies?

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  • grape-ape
    replied
    i'm sorry to hear about your brother. i have known people that have been addicted and had an uncle that was terribly addicted to alcohol. he would hide little vodka bottles all over the place, his car, the woods outside his house, the stack of firewood, different places in his house. he did this so he would never seem like he was going to the same place to drink. but that's what all his long "walks" were always about.

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  • Sonambulo
    replied
    El pueblo necesitas sus vicios

    El hermano mio ha sido adicto por mas de 30 anos; cumplio una condena de un ano en los 90s por atentado de exportacion de coca. Fue la primera y ultima vez que he caido preso. Lamentablemente, su adiccion, le causo problemas mentales y nunca busco, o rehusa aceptar, tratamiento, situacion que causo su distancia de la familia. Increiblemente, a los 45 anos termino su Bachillerato en Agronomia, en la Universidad de Puerto Rico, titulo que no le he servido para nada ya que su adiccion y estado mental no le permite ser contratado. Nunca se caso, o tenido una relacion larga con una mujer, nunca he tenido carro, o un buen trabajo. Nunca he disfrutado de nada. Vive como un desamparado en una casa familiar casi caida. Una vez en los 2000s se desaparecio en Venezuela por 6 meses. Todo comenso con su consumo de marihuana. El sufrimiento de la familia al verlo asi he sido profundo, especialmente para mi mama. Aun oro por su bienestar pero temo por su destino final. Maldito sean los tiradores de drogas y que mueran una vil muerte. Y, a los consumidores, ellos son 50 porciento del problema. Si quieren una vida como la de mi hermano, que sigan consumiendo.

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  • Puerto Rico Drug Addiction Turning Resident Users Into Zombies?

    Puerto Rico Drug Addiction Turning Resident Users Into Zombies?

    On an island where the economy is manipulated by drugs, and hundreds of thousands of residents have consumed or are currently consuming addictive substances, it might not come as a surprise that Puerto Rico has been described as “the new front door of the war on drugs”, or “the backdoor to America.”

    The island's strategic localization, its multiple rich ports, added to its commonwealth political status and relationship to the United States, have served drug cartels from South America and the Caribbean, as the perfect trampoline to the mainland.

    But the drug doesn’t just travel out of the island; it also stays inside affecting residents every year. Thousands of people wake up everyday to the reality of having to maintain an addiction, to some of the most dangerous substances.

    One of the island’s most common drugs, mainly for being cheaper and producing a strong high effect, is Xylazine, better known as horse tranquilizer. This new medication, introduced on early 2000 is primarily produced and used by veterinarians as an anesthesia for dental work or castration in horses.

    In humans the powerful substance causes the mind to fade in and out of conscience and the body to bend to the ground even while standing on its feet. The effects last for a little less than six hours, leaving the addict with the need to roam the streets in a search for the next fix, many resorting to theft and panhandling in and effort to stay awake, and alive.

    On a recent episode of "Drug Inc.", National Geographic Channel, labeled these Xylazine drug addicts as sleep walking zombies, living on a zombie island.

    Zombie Island: Puerto Rico Drug Addiction Turning Resident Users Into Zombies (VIDEO)
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